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President Trump disembarks from Air Force One in Green Bay, Wisconsin on June 25. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The Trump family's attempt to block the publication of a forthcoming tell-all book by the president's niece was blocked on Thursday by a New York City judge, AP reports.

Driving the news: "She's not allowed to write a book," Trump told Axios' Jonathan Swan this week, referring to Mary Trump, the daughter of Fred Trump Jr., the president's deceased oldest brother. "You know, when we settled with her and her brother, who I do have a good relationship with — she's got a brother, Fred, who I do have a good relationship with, but when we settled, she has a total ... signed a nondisclosure."

  • Trump said that his niece's nondisclosure agreement with him was a "very powerful one. ... It covers everything."

Details: Judge Peter Kelly ruled on Thursday that "the Surrogates Court lacked jurisdiction in this case," per AP.

The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Go deeper: Trump says niece "not allowed" to write book because of nondisclosure agreement

Go deeper

What to watch in tonight's debate

Joe Biden (left) and President Trump (right) are facing off in Cleveland for the first presidential debate. Photos: Alex Wong (of Biden) and David Hume Kennerly (of Trump)/Getty Images

President Trump will try to break Joe Biden's composure by going after his son Hunter and other family members in tonight's first presidential debate — a campaign source tells Axios "nothing will be off the table" — while Biden plans to stick to the economy, coronavirus and new revelations about how Trump avoided paying taxes.

Driving the news: Biden and Trump are set to debate at 9pm ET at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, and it will be moderated by Fox News' Chris Wallace.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
1 hour ago - Economy & Business

The winners and losers of the pandemic holiday season

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The pandemic has upended Thanksgiving and the shopping season that the holiday kicks off, creating a new crop of economic winners and losers.

The big picture: Just as it has exacerbated inequality in every other facet of American life, the coronavirus pandemic is deepening inequities in the business world, with the biggest and most powerful companies rapidly outpacing the smaller players.

Coronavirus cases rose 10% in the week before Thanksgiving

Expand chart
Data: The COVID Tracking Project, state health departments; Map: Andrew Witherspoon, Sara Wise/Axios

The daily rate of new coronavirus infections rose by about 10 percent in the final week before Thanksgiving, continuing a dismal trend that may get even worse in the weeks to come.

Why it matters: Travel and large holiday celebrations are most dangerous in places where the virus is spreading widely — and right now, that includes the entire U.S.