Apr 11, 2017

Doctors disagree about when women need mammograms

AP

Physician recommendations vary on when to start and stop mammograms for breast cancer screening — and how often to screen patients in between, according to a new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine.

Why it matters: Doctor recommendations are one of the most important factors determining whether and when patients get screened for breast cancer. Breast cancer can be detected — and then treated — earlier with mammograms, but there is a risk of false positives and unnecessarily treating the disease. The study "suggests a large proportion of primary care physicians recommend screening mammography for women who are more likely to experience harms than benefits from the examination," per researchers not involved in the study.

Researchers found 81 percent of doctors surveyed recommended women between the ages of 40 and 44 receive mammograms and 88 percent suggested screening to patients aged 45 to 49. That advice counters guidelines from the U.S Preventive Services Task Force that suggests mammography for women should begin at age 50 and should occur every two years.

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What the coronavirus means for Trump's presidency

Photo Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photo: Chris Graythen/Getty Images

A poor response to the coronavirus could be politically devastating for President Trump, and so far his administration has given the strong impression that it’s still scrambling as the risk of a pandemic mounts.

Why it matters: There’s only so much any president can do to stop a virus from spreading, and for now the coronavirus is still very much under control within the U.S. But if the disease get worse in the months ahead, and if the administration seems to be caught off guard, that spells trouble for public confidence in Trump.

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Coronavirus updates: New global case numbers surpass China's

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens.

The novel coronavirus is now affecting every continent but Antarctica and the WHO said Wednesday the number of new cases reported outside China has exceeded those inside the country for the first time.

The big picture: COVID-19 has killed more than 2,800 people and infected over 82,000 others in some 50 countries and territories. As Denmark and Estonia reported their first cases Thursday, Scott Morrison, prime minister of Australia — which has 23 confirmed infections — told a news conference, "The risk of a global pandemic is very much upon us."

Go deeperArrowUpdated 3 hours ago - Health

Mass shooting in Milwaukee: What we know

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett in 2012. Photo: John Gress/Corbis via Getty Images

Six people died in a shooting at the Molson Coors Brewing Company in Milwaukee Molson Coors on Wednesday, including the 51-year-old gunman, Mayor Tom Barrett told reporters at an evening press conference with local police.

Details: All of the victims worked at the brewery complex, as did the shooter who died of "an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound, police confirmed in a statement late Wednesday.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy