Courtesy The Dispatch

Two of the biggest names in conservative journalism — Steve Hayes, formerly of the now-defunct Weekly Standard, and Jonah Goldberg, a longtime National Review star — will launch The Dispatch, a digital media company, on Tuesday.

Why it matters: The Dispatch, citing "worrisome" trends in journalism on the right, is plunging into a tough space — conservative, but not a booster of President Trump. "The conservative movement was not intended to be a handmaiden to a single political party," the co-founders say in a letter to readers.

The website will go live today, the first in a string of newsletters begins tomorrow, and Goldberg has begun the first podcast, The Remnant.

  • Hayes told Axios the hallmark will be "reporting from the center right": "We're unapologetically conservative, but ... these have to be fact-based arguments."
  • The Dispatch, based in Washington, begins with 8 full-time staffers — "a pirate skiff with limited provisions amidst choppy waters."
  • The co-founders raised roughly $6 million from a few dozen investors.
  • It's partnering with Substack, the paid newsletter publishing platform, which will begin hosting Goldberg's "The G-File" newsletter Friday.

Hayes and Goldberg — along with their senior editor, former National Review senior editor David French — are longtime critics of Trump.

  • Hayes said The Dispatch will be "Trump-skeptical." "We think of it as more 'beyond Trump' than 'anti-Trump.' But no one will have any doubt what we think," he told Axios.

In the letter to readers, Hayes and Goldberg say:

  • "We are not launching The Dispatch as an indictment of anyone or anything."
  • "We are launching The Dispatch to provide engaged citizens with a community for thoughtful, fact-based reporting and commentary on politics, policy and culture."

Go deeper: Conservative news goes to war over impeachment

Go deeper

Trump tightens screws on ByteDance to sell Tiktok

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President Trump added more pressure Friday night on China-based TikTok parent ByteDance to exit the U.S., ordering it to divest all assets related to the U.S. operation of TikTok within 90 days.

Between the lines: The order means ByteDance must be wholly disentangled from TikTok in the U.S. by November. Trump had previously ordered TikTok banned if ByteDance hadn't struck a deal within 45 days. The new order likely means ByteDance has just another 45 days after that to fully close the deal, one White House source told Axios.

Updated 41 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m. ET: 21,056,850 — Total deaths: 762,293— Total recoveries: 13,100,902Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m ET: 5,306,215 — Total deaths: 168,334 — Total recoveries: 1,796,309 — Total tests: 65,676,624Map.
  3. Health: CDC: Survivors of COVID-19 have up to three months of immunity Fauci believes normalcy will return by "the end of 2021" with vaccine — The pandemic's toll on mental health — FDA releases first-ever list of medical supplies in shortage.
  4. States: California passes 600,000 confirmed coronavirus cases.
  5. Cities: Coronavirus pandemic dims NYC's annual 9/11 Tribute in Light.
  6. Business: How small businesses got stiffed — Unemployment starts moving in the right direction.
  7. Politics: Biden signals fall strategy with new ads.

Harris: "Women are going to be a priority" in Biden administration

Sen. Kamala Harris at an event in Wilmington, Del. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In her first sit-down interview since being named Joe Biden's running mate, Sen. Kamala Harris talked about what she'll do to fight for women if elected VP, and how the Democrats are thinking about voter turnout strategies ahead of November.

What they're saying: "In a Biden-Harris administration women are going to be a priority, understanding that women have many priorities and all of them must be acknowledged," Harris told The 19th*'s Errin Haines-Whack.