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Police in Broward County, FL to carry AR-15 rifles on school grounds

Police officers are seen in front of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Photo: Joe Raedle / Getty Images

The sheriff in Broward County, Florida, where 17 high schoolers were killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, has said deputies will be allowed to carry rifles on school grounds, the Associated Press reports.

The backdrop: At a listening session at the White House on Wednesday, President Trump advocated for armed personnel to be in schools as a way to prevent school shootings.

  • Per the AP, the resource officer at the high school "was carrying a weapon when the shooting happened last week but did not discharge his firearm."
  • When the rifles are not being used, they will "be locked in a patrol car ... until the agency secures gun locks and lockers."

Go deeper: What the parents, students said at the listening session.

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D.C.'s March for our Lives: "The voters are coming"

Protestor at D.C.'s March for our Lives.
Protestor at D.C.'s March for our Lives. Photo: Axios' Stef Kight.

D.C.'s March for our Lives event is expected to see more than half a million participants.

Why it matters: While D.C. is the primary march, there are hundreds of others around the world and across the country. Led by students, the march is "to demand that a comprehensive and effective bill be immediately brought before Congress to address" gun issues, per the organization's mission statement.

Haley Britzky 6 hours ago
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DOJ eyeing tool to allow access to encrypted data on smartphones

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.
Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. Photo: Win McNamee / Getty Images

The Justice Department is in "a preliminary stage" of discussions about requiring tech companies building "tools into smartphones and other devices" that would allow law enforcement investigators to access encrypted data, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: This has been on the FBI's mind since 2010, and last month the White House "circulated a memo...outlining ways to think about solving the problem," officials told the Times. Both FBI Director Christopher Wray, and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, support finding ways for law enforcement to access data without compromising devices security.