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WeWork's location at the Circa building in Denver. Photo courtesy of WeWor

Aaron Romigh looks over his laptop and sees a half-dozen people, all wearing masks, in a WeWork coworking space in Denver. "The energy feels good," he says.

Why it matters: Energy — whether from the sound of voices or body language of collaboration — is what people want after a year of working from home. And it's driving a renewed interest in coworking spaces.

  • "There's a lot of pent-up demand coming from the pandemic," says Romigh, WeWork's western region director.

Context: Denver's robust coworking community took a huge hit with the pandemic lockdown, particularly those located in the urban core.

  • WeWork closed four Denver locations and canceled a fifth lease as part of a right-sizing of its portfolio. Other companies closed spaces, too.
  • Colorado ranked 12th in the nation for its work-from-home environment, one study says.

What's happening: The clients who are taking tours at Modworks, a coworking space that overlooks city hall with views of the mountains, are more often individuals rather than small companies, says founder John Borst.

  • The other key is flexibility. "I think folks aren't looking necessarily for full-time coworking ... but it basically being an alternative to home," he says.
  • The other demand is for collaboration space where coworkers can gather occasionally to avoid prolonged Zoom calls.

The other side: One of the major risks facing the industry in Denver is a glut of open office space.

  • The market began to reach saturation, some believe, before the pandemic and now landlords with empty spaces may flood the market with flex working spaces.

This story first appeared in the Axios Denver newsletter, designed to help readers get smarter, faster on the most consequential news unfolding in their own backyard.

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Go deeper

John Frank, author of Denver
Apr 8, 2021 - Axios Denver

Millennials really want to live in Denver

Reproduced from SmartAsset analysis. Chart: John Frank/Axios

Denver continues to be a leading draw for ages 25 to 39 to come to Colorado, a recent SmartAsset report looking at 2019 data shows.

By the numbers:

  • The state saw the largest percentage increase in millennials at 2%.
  • Colorado has a larger proportion of millennials than any other state at 23%.

This story first appeared in the Axios Denver newsletter, designed to help readers get smarter, faster on the most consequential news unfolding in their own backyard.

Apr 8, 2021 - Axios Denver

Pickup vs. delivery: What it costs to get takeout in Denver

A pizza pie is pulled out of the oven at Fat Sully's on Colfax Avenue. Photo: Cyrus McCrimmon/The Denver Post via Getty Images

If you’ve ordered takeout during the pandemic, you’ve probably noticed the price of the same meal can swing wildly depending on the delivery company or whether it's bought directly from the restaurant.

Why it matters: We've grown dependent on food delivery apps like Uber Eats and DoorDash in the last year, but they hike costs for consumers and shrink already pinched margins for restaurants.

Here's an example from Fat Sully’s, a pizza joint with three Denver locations. We ordered a 20-inch red pie.

Good to know:

  1. Delivery fees are highly variable and can differ based on the time, day, location and app.
  2. Then there’s the "service" fee, or the commission that delivery companies charge restaurants for each order.

State of play: Complaints from restaurant owners who were struggling to withstand the pandemic prompted many Colorado cities — including Denver, Aurora, Broomfield, Commerce City and Morrison — to put temporary caps on the commission fees food delivery companies could charge restaurants.

  • Most laws blocked commission charges above 15% and expired March 31.
  • In some cases, companies added extra fees to consumers to work around the limits.

Denver’s 15% cap has been extended to mid-June. The emergency measure was first enacted last October and sponsored by District 4 Council member Kendra Black.

This story first appeared in the Axios Denver newsletter, designed to help readers get smarter, faster on the most consequential news unfolding in their own backyard.

Teachers across the U.S. protest laws restricting racism lessons

Thousands of teachers and other educators held protests across the U.S. Saturday against the actions of "at least 15 Republican-led states" that aim to restrict teaching about racism in class, the Washington Post reports.

Driving the news: There were demonstrations in at least 22 cities for the "Day of Action" to raise awareness about moves to limit students' exposure to critical race theory, which links racial discrimination to the nation's foundations and legal system, per Axios' Russell Contreras.

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