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A dentist in Maine wearing a mask while working with a patient in March. Photo: Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Health care — specifically dentistry — was a major reason Friday's jobs report blew away economists’ expectations.

By the numbers: Of the 312,000 jobs the health care sector added in May, 245,000 were in dentists' offices.

Yes, but: Since the coronavirus lockdowns started, almost 1.2 million people who work in health care, especially those who work in administrative roles in outpatient settings, still have lost their jobs.

The bottom line: Providers are eager to get patients back in their offices and hospitals, sometimes advertising they are resuming elective procedures.

  • That's starting to happen with tooth procedures and routine cleanings, which necessitated rehiring laid-off employees. But volumes still don't appear to be anywhere close to what they were previously.

Go deeper: Doctors Without Borders aids U.S. health care workers treating the coronavirus, including in N.Y and Fla.

Go deeper

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
Sep 2, 2020 - Health

Half of Americans fear a health-related bankruptcy

Data: Gallup; Chart: Axios Visuals

The number of Americans who worry about bankruptcy if they have a serious health issue has spiked over the last year and a half — particularly among men, people of color and young adults, according to a new survey from West Health and Gallup.

Between the lines: Health care costs were a huge issue even when the economy was good and we weren't in a global pandemic. Now, millions of people have gotten sick, lost their jobs, lost their health insurance, or all three.

2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Inhofe loudly sets Trump straight on defense bill

Sen. Jim Inhofe speaks with reporters in the Capitol last month. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Senator Jim Inhofe told President Trump today he'll likely fail to get two big wishes in pending defense spending legislation, bellowing into his cellphone: "This is the only chance to get our bill passed," a source who overheard part of their conversation tells Axios.

Why it matters: Republicans are ready to test whether Trump's threats of vetoing the bill, which has passed every year for more than half a century, are empty.

Conspiracy theories blow back on Trump's White House

Sidney Powell. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

President Trump has rarely met a conspiracy theory he doesn't like, but he and other Republicans now worry the wild tales told by lawyers Sidney Powell and Lin Wood may cost them in Georgia's Senate special elections.

Why it matters: The two are telling Georgians not to vote for Republicans David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler because of a bizarre, baseless and potentially self-defeating theory: It's not worth voting because the Chinese Communist Party has rigged the voting machines.