Reps. Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Omar. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call

Democrats in the House and Senate introduced a bill on Wednesday to repeal President Trump's controversial travel ban on seven countries, five of which are predominantly Muslim.

Details: Sen. Chris Coons (D-Del.) and Rep. Judy Chu (D-Cali.) introduced the bill with the support of Muslim Reps. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) and Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.), as well as every Democratic presidential candidate in Congress, per the Washington Post. The NO BAN Act would repeal all three versions of Trump's travel ban, completely prohibit discrimination on the basis of religion for immigrants and limit any broad executive authority to issue new travel bans.

  • Coons noted that the odds the bill will get a Senate floor vote or get signed by Trump are very slim, but said: "It is still worth articulating that there is a legal path towards keeping our country safe and narrowing the power of the executive so that a future president does not do this again."

Background: Federal courts blocked Trump's first two versions of the ban, which exclusively targeted seven different Muslim countries. His final version was upheld by the Supreme Court. It includes five Muslim countries, along with North Korea and Venezuela.

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Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m. ET: 33,867,247 — Total deaths: 1,012,341 — Total recoveries: 23,537,059Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 8 p.m. ET: 7,229,319 — Total deaths: 206,887 — Total recoveries: 2,840,688 — Total tests: 103,939,667Map.
  3. Education: School-aged children now make up 10% of all U.S COVID-19 cases.
  4. Health: The coronavirus' alarming impact on the body.
  5. Business: Real-time data show economy's rebound slowing but still going.
  6. Sports: Steelers-Titans NFL game delayed after coronavirus outbreak.
Ina Fried, author of Login
2 hours ago - Technology

Facebook removes Trump ads tying refugees to COVID-19

Photo Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook said Wednesday that it was removing a series of ads from President Trump's campaign that linked American acceptance of refugees with increased coronavirus risk, a connection Facebook says is without merit.

Why it matters: The ads were pulled after they received thousands of impressions and are a sign that the Trump campaign continues to test the limits of social media rules on false information.

Over 73 million people watched the first debate on TV

Data: Nielsen; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

More than 73.1 million people watched the first presidential debate on television on Tuesday night, according to Nielsen ratings.

Why it matters: While that's a sizable audience for any American TV program, it's down more than 13% from the record number of TV viewers who tuned in for the first debate of the 2016 election. The chaotic nature of the debate and the overall uncertainty around this year's election may have pushed some viewers away.