Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call

Even before President Trump's shutdown remarks on Saturday, Democrats and aides on the Hill were dismissing his planned shutdown compromise offer as inadequate.

As first reported by Axios, Trump was expected to make two offers to Democrats in exchange for $5.7 billion in funds for a border wall: Extend DACA protections for Dreamers, who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children, and extend the legal status of Temporary Protected Status (TPS) holders. Half an hour before the speech, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a statement: "Unfortunately, initial reports make clear that his proposal is a compilation of several previously rejected initiatives, each of which is unacceptable and in total, do not represent a good faith effort to restore certainty to people's lives."

Democratic Whip Dick Durbin also issued a statement:

"First, President Trump and Senate Majority Leader McConnell must open the government today.  Second, I cannot support the proposed offer as reported and do not believe it can pass the Senate. Third, I am ready to sit down at any time after the government is opened and work to resolve all outstanding issues."
— Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.)

A Democratic aide told Axios: "Dems were not consulted on this and have rejected similar overtures previously."

  • "The BRIDGE Act does not fully protect Dreamers and is not a permanent solution."
  • "This is not a compromise as it includes the same wasteful, ineffective $5.7 billion wall demand that shut down the government in the first place."
  • "This cannot pass the House or Senate."
  • "The President must agree to re-open government and join Democrats to negotiate on border security measures that work and not an expensive and ineffective wall that the President promised Mexico would pay for."

What we're watching: Whether any moderate Democrats break ranks and ask their leaders to reconsider.

Be smart: The risk Democrats face, especially moderates, is that the deal may seem appealing or reasonable to many independents who voted for them.

Go deeper: Trump expected to propose DACA-TPS immigration compromise

Go deeper

Amy Coney Barrett's immediate impact

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

In her first week on the job, Amy Coney Barrett may be deciding which votes to count in the presidential election. By her third week, she’ll be deciding the fate of the Affordable Care Act.

Where it stands: The Senate votes on Barrett’s nomination tomorrow. If she’s confirmed, Chief Justice John Roberts is expected to swear her in at the Supreme Court within hours, an administration official tells Axios.

Texas Democrats beg Biden to spend now

Photo: Ron Jenkins/Getty Images

The Biden campaign is rebuffing persistent pleas from Texas Democrats to spend at least $10 million in the Lone Star state, several people familiar with the talks tell Axios.

Why it matters: If Texas — which has 38 electoral votes and is steadily getting more blue, but hasn't backed a Democrat for president since 1976 — flipped to the Biden column, it would be game over. But the RealClearPolitics polling average stubbornly hovers at +2.6 for Trump — and Team Biden appears more focused on closer targets.

2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Election night in Trumpworld

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Chris Carlson-Pool/Getty Images

A luxe election-night watch party at the Trump International Hotel on Pennsylvania Avenue is being planned for President Trump's donors, friends and advisers — but Trump's hand in it is minimal because he's "very superstitious" — people familiar with the plans tell Axios.

The big picture: This "mecca for all things MAGA," as one adviser described it, is one of three hubs where they say Trumpworld will watch returns. The others are the war room at campaign HQ in Rosslyn, Virginia, and the White House residence, where Trump and the first lady will gather close family and advisers before heading to the hotel later that night, the sources said.