Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call

Even before President Trump's shutdown remarks on Saturday, Democrats and aides on the Hill were dismissing his planned shutdown compromise offer as inadequate.

As first reported by Axios, Trump was expected to make two offers to Democrats in exchange for $5.7 billion in funds for a border wall: Extend DACA protections for Dreamers, who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children, and extend the legal status of Temporary Protected Status (TPS) holders. Half an hour before the speech, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a statement: "Unfortunately, initial reports make clear that his proposal is a compilation of several previously rejected initiatives, each of which is unacceptable and in total, do not represent a good faith effort to restore certainty to people's lives."

Democratic Whip Dick Durbin also issued a statement:

"First, President Trump and Senate Majority Leader McConnell must open the government today.  Second, I cannot support the proposed offer as reported and do not believe it can pass the Senate. Third, I am ready to sit down at any time after the government is opened and work to resolve all outstanding issues."
— Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.)

A Democratic aide told Axios: "Dems were not consulted on this and have rejected similar overtures previously."

  • "The BRIDGE Act does not fully protect Dreamers and is not a permanent solution."
  • "This is not a compromise as it includes the same wasteful, ineffective $5.7 billion wall demand that shut down the government in the first place."
  • "This cannot pass the House or Senate."
  • "The President must agree to re-open government and join Democrats to negotiate on border security measures that work and not an expensive and ineffective wall that the President promised Mexico would pay for."

What we're watching: Whether any moderate Democrats break ranks and ask their leaders to reconsider.

Be smart: The risk Democrats face, especially moderates, is that the deal may seem appealing or reasonable to many independents who voted for them.

Go deeper: Trump expected to propose DACA-TPS immigration compromise

Go deeper

How small businesses got stiffed by the coronavirus pandemic

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The story of American businesses in the coronavirus pandemic is a tale of two markets — one made up of tech firms and online retailers as winners awash in capital, and another of brick-and-mortar mom-and-pop shops that is collapsing.

Why it matters: The coronavirus pandemic has created an environment where losing industries like traditional retail and hospitality as well as a sizable portion of firms owned by women, immigrants and people of color are wiped out and may be gone for good.

Apple's antitrust fight turns Epic

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Millions of angry gamers may soon join the chorus of voices calling for an antitrust crackdown on Apple, as the iPhone giant faces a new lawsuit and PR blitz from Epic Games, maker of mega-hit Fortnite.

Why it matters: Apple is one of several Big Tech firms accused of violating the spirit, if not the letter, of antitrust law. A high-profile lawsuit could become a roadmap for either building a case against tech titans under existing antitrust laws or writing new ones better suited to the digital economy.

Survey: Fears grow about Social Security’s future

Data: AARP survey of 1,441 U.S. adults conducted July 14–27, 2020 a ±3.4% margin of error at the 95% confidence level; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

Younger Americans are increasingly concerned that Social Security won't be enough to wholly fall back on once they retire, according to a survey conducted by AARP — in honor of today's 85th anniversary of the program — given first to Axios.

Why it matters: Young people's concerns about financial insecurity once they're on a restricted income are rising — and that generation is worried the program, which currently pays out to 65 million beneficiaries, won't be enough to sustain them.