Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/Getty Images

Democrats clearly see a winning 2018 issue in the Trump administration’s approach to pre-existing conditions. They — and vulnerable incumbents in particular — have been hammering away at the Justice Department’s attempts to strike down the Affordable Care Act protections for sick people.

The big picture: Sen. Joe Manchin wrote an op-ed about it. Florida is part of the lawsuit that got all this started, as Sen. Bill Nelson — who’s being challenged by Gov. Rick Scott in November — will remind you.

Moderate GOP governors joined in yesterday. Ohio’s John Kasich, Maryland’s Larry Hogan and Nevada’s Brian Sandoval signed a statement calling on the Justice Department to reverse its position.

What’s next: Conservatives are expected to release some details of their new ACA repeal plan today, ahead of a formal rollout Wednesday.

  • It has little chance of passing, but more potential to rile up both parties’ bases — conservatives who are still upset over last year’s repeal failure, and liberals who are on the hunt for health care attacks ahead of the midterms.

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Updated 15 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 8 a.m. ET: 12,520,431 — Total deaths: 560,830 — Total recoveries — 6,900,718Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 8 a.m. ET: 3,184,722 — Total deaths: 134,830 — Total recoveries: 983,185 — Total tested: 38,856,341Map.
  3. Public health: The reality of the coronavirus bites.
  4. Trade: Trump says he's no longer considering phase-two trade deal with China because the pandemic damaged the two countries' relationship.
  5. 🎧 Podcast: Rural America has its own coronavirus problem.
1 hour ago - Health

We're losing the war on the coronavirus

Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

By any standard, no matter how you look at it, the U.S. is losing its war against the coronavirus.

Why it matters: The pandemic is not an abstraction, and it is not something that’s simmering in the background. It is an ongoing emergency ravaging nearly the entire country, with a loss of life equivalent to a Sept. 11 every three days — for four months and counting.

Trump commutes Roger Stone's sentence

Roger Stone arriving at his sentencing hearing on Feb. 20. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump on Friday evening commuted the sentence of his longtime associate Roger Stone, according to two senior administration officials. Stone in February was sentenced to 40 months in prison for crimes including obstruction, witness tampering and making false statements to Congress.

Why it matters: The controversial move brings an abrupt end to the possibility of Stone spending time behind bars. He had been scheduled to report to prison on July 14.