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Harvard Business School. Photo: Brooks Kraft LLC/Corbis via Getty Images

Staffers from past Democratic presidential campaigns are more likely to have gone to an Ivy League college than staffers from Republican campaigns, a new study from North Carolina at Chapel Hill shows.

Why it matters: The student bodies of Ivy League schools are less representative of the U.S. overall, and campaigns with less diversity run the risk of failing to reach voters from different ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds. The study warns that if Democrats want President Trump out of office, they should "reach far beyond the hallowed halls of the Ivy League and other elite education institutions to help them craft their appeals to voters."

By the numbers: The School of Media and Journalism at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill collected profiles from 954 presidential primary and general election campaign staffers from the 2004–2016 cycles.

  • 20% of all hires by Democratic campaigns are from just 7 schools: Harvard (5%), Stanford (3%), New York University (3%), University of California Berkeley (3%), Georgetown (2%), Columbia (2%) and Yale (2%).
  • The top 3 Republican schools are public: University of Texas, Ohio State University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

The bottom line, according to the study: "Our public and non-elite private institutions, many far away from the country’s major cities and corridors of power, often have diverse student bodies in terms of geography, class, race and ethnicity, and life experiences. They are often more representative of America than elite, Ivy League institutions."

Go deeper

Republicans pledge to set aside differences and work with Biden

President Biden speaks to Sen. Mitch McConnell after being sworn in at the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. Photo: Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images

Several Republicans praised President Biden's calls for unity during his inaugural address on Wednesday and pledged to work together for the benefit of the American people.

Why it matters: The Democrats only have a slim majority in the Senate and Biden will likely need to work with the GOP to pass his legislative agenda.

The Biden protection plan

Joe Biden announces his first run for the presidency in June 1987. Photo: Howard L. Sachs/CNP/Getty Images

The Joe Biden who became the 46th president on Wednesday isn't the same blabbermouth who failed in 1988 and 2008.

Why it matters: Biden now heeds guidance about staying on task with speeches and no longer worries a gaffe or two will cost him an election. His staff also limits the places where he speaks freely and off the cuff. This Biden protective bubble will only tighten in the months ahead, aides tell Axios.

Bush labels Clyburn the “savior” for Democrats

House Majority Whip James Clyburn takes a selfie Wednesday with former President George W. Bush. Photo: Patrick Semansky-Pool/Getty Images

Former President George W. Bush credited Rep. James Clyburn with being the "savior" of the Democratic Party, telling the South Carolinian at Wednesday's inauguration his endorsement allowed Joe Biden to win the party's presidential nomination.

Why it matters: The nation's last two-term Republican president also said Clyburn's nod allowed for the transfer of power, because he felt only Biden had the ability to unseat President Trump.