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Two top congressional Democrats have asked Facebook and Twitter to investigate attempts by Russia-backed accounts to undermine Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation with a hashtag campaign calling for the public release of a partisan memo involved in the probe.

Why it matters: The letter from Sen. Dianne Feinstein and Rep. Adam Schiff is an attempt to draw attention to the possibility that Russian accounts boosted the "#ReleaseTheMemo" campaign. If that's true, the Democrats wrote, "we are witnessing an ongoing attack by the Russian government through Kremlin-linked social media actors directly acting to intervene and influence our democratic process."

Backdrop: Last Thursday, a House committee voted to allow all House members to see a Republican memo that "selectively references and distorts highly classified information," which led to calls for the memo to be released publicly. #ReleaseTheMemo became the top trending hashtag among accounts linked to the Kremlin, according to the letter sent to Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg and Twitter's Jack Dorsey.

Big picture: The social media companies are getting hammered over Russian interference, and despite their attempts to crack down on Russia-backed accounts and their political activity, this could be a new example of the problem.

Go deeper: The full letter.

Go deeper

Updated 15 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Tim Scott says Trump "misspoke" when he told Proud Boys to "stand by"

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Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.) told reporters on Wednesday that he believes President Trump "misspoke" when he told the far-right "Proud Boys" group to "stand back and stand by" in response to a question about condemning white supremacy at the first presidential debate.

Catch up quick: Moderator Chris Wallace asked Trump on Tuesday, "Are you willing, tonight, to condemn white supremacists and militia groups and to say that they need to stand down?" Trump asked who specifically he should condemn, and then responded, "Proud Boys, stand back and stand by. But I'll tell you what, somebody's got to do something about antifa and the left."

Updated 23 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Commission on Presidential Debates wants changes

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The Commission on Presidential Debates announced Wednesday that it plans to implement changes to rules for the remaining debates, after Tuesday night's head-to-head between Joe Biden and Donald Trump was practically incoherent for most of the night.

What they are saying: "Last night's debate made clear that additional structure should be added to the format of the remaining debates to ensure a more orderly discussion of the issues," the CPD said in a statement.

Trump says he doesn't know who Proud Boys are after telling them to "stand by"

President Trump told reporters on Wednesday that he doesn't know who the "Proud Boys" are, after saying at the presidential debate last night that the far-right group should "stand back and stand by" in response to a question asking him to condemn white supremacists.

Why it matters: The comments set off outrage and calls for clarification from a number of Republican senators. After being asked several times on Wednesday whether he will condemn white supremacy, Trump responded: "I have always denounced any form — any form of any of that, you have to denounce. But I also — Joe Biden has to say something about antifa."