Feb 26, 2020 - World

Deadly Delhi clashes: What you need to know

Supporters of a new citizenship law throw stones at the burning houses and shops of those who oppose the law during clashes in Delhi, India. Photo: Yawar Nazir/ Getty Images

Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal called for the Indian Army to be called in on Wednesday as the capital's worst religious violence in decades entered a third day.

What's happening: The BBC reports at least 20 people have been killed and 189 others wounded since Sunday in the clashes between Hindu and Muslim groups over a new citizenship law.

  • Some Muslims abandoned their homes after they were targeted by looters, per the Guardian.

The big picture: The clashes coincided with President Trump's two-day visit to India. Muslims in northeast Delhi had staged a protest against the Citizenship Amendment Act, which allows religious minorities but excludes Muslims from nearby countries to become citizens if they can show they were persecuted for their religion.

  • Trump told reporters before departing Tuesday that he had "heard about the violence but had not discussed it" with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi because he wanted to leave the issue with Indian authorities, according to AP.

Of note: Modi's Hindu nationalist government has repeatedly blocked internet access in parts of the country that are home to protests against the citizenship law.

Go deeper: India gives Trump warm welcome as brutal protests rip New Delhi apart

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India announces nationwide lockdown to stop spread of coronavirus

Paramilitary soldiers stand guard on a deserted street during Janta Curfew, Srinagar, India, March 22. Photo: Waseem Andrabi/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced on Tuesday that the entire country will be locked down for three weeks beginning at midnight in an effort to stop the spread of the coronavirus.

Why it matters: With 1.3 billion people, India is the second-most populated country in the world. India currently has 519 confirmed cases.

Go deeperArrowMar 24, 2020 - World

Female protesters often lead to effective mass movements

Photo Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photos: Mahmoud Hjaj/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images, Marwan Naamani/picture alliance via Getty Images, and ANWAR AMRO/AFP via Getty Images

Gender-based violence, WhatsApp message taxes and the rising cost of bread have set off some of the largest protests in the past year, and women were among the first in the streets, often risking their personal safety.

Driving the news: Women in Mexico have organized "A Day Without Us," a national strike on March 9, to coincide with International Women's Day. Women are encouraged to "disappear": to stay at home, away from work, out of stores and off the streets to highlight their vital role, The New York Times writes.

Go deeperArrowMar 9, 2020 - World

Coronavirus tests world leaders like never before

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

In the coming months, the decisions world leaders make — and their ability to communicate them effectively — could determine whether millions live or die, and whether the global economy stays afloat.

What to watch: Nations are judging their leaders on a daily basis. They may ultimately be revered or reviled based on the decisions they make now. Some may emerge with new powers that last well beyond the outbreak.