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Evan Vucci / AP

Reuters ran a story that got a lot of attention last week. The headline: "Exclusive: Trump says Republican border tax could boost U.S. jobs." Republicans who support border adjustment immediately celebrated — blasting out press releases trumpeting Trump's comments.

Here's what Trump actually said to Reuters: "I certainly support a form of tax on the border ... What is going to happen is companies are going to come back here, they're going to build their factories and they're going to create a lot of jobs and there's no tax."

The problem: In the days following Trump's comments, we've heard that his top economic advisor Gary Cohn is less than enthusiastic about the tax, and yesterday on Fox Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin expressed deep reservations about the tax. Even public supporters of the proposal — the same folks who have to publicly say that Trump is on board — admit privately they have no idea what's in his head.

Between the lines: A source who's worked closely with Trump tells us that when Trump hears border adjustment tax, he's often hearing "border tax." That could be something very different. Remember that the only idea in this realm that Trump has spoken of publicly and enthusiastically is his idea to punish American companies that move factories overseas with 35 percent import tariffs when they try to sell their goods back into the United States. That's very different than a tax levied on all imports.

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Biden holds first phone call with Putin, raises Navalny arrest

Putin takes a call in 2017. Photo: Handout/Anadolu Agency/Getty

President Biden on Tuesday held his first call since taking office with Vladimir Putin, pressing the Russian president on the arrest of opposition leader Alexey Navalny and the Russia-linked hack on U.S. government agencies, AP reports.

The state of play: Biden also planned to raise arms control, bounties allegedly placed on U.S. troops in Afghanistan and the war in Ukraine, according to White House press secretary Jen Psaki, who said the call took place while she was delivering a press briefing. Psaki added that a full readout will be provided later Tuesday.

Biden signs racial equity executive orders

Joe Biden prays at Grace Lutheran Church in Kenosha, Wisconsin, on September 3, 2020, in the aftermath of the police shooting of Jacob Blake. PHOTO: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

President Joe Biden on Tuesday signed executive orders on housing and ending the Justice Department's use of private prisons as part of what the White House is calling his “racial equity agenda.”

The big picture: Biden needs the support of Congress to push through police reform or new voting rights legislation. The executive orders serve as his down payment to immediately address systemic racism while he focuses on the pandemic.