Jun 19, 2017

Deadly heat waves could hit most of the world by 2100

Rick Stevens / AP

By the year 2100, 74% of people on Earth may be exposed to deadly heat waves if nothing is done to address climate change, according to a new study published in Nature. Researchers found that 30% of the world's population is currently at risk from deadly heat and even if we begin to drastically reduce greenhouse gas emissions, 50% will still be at risk.

The study: Lead author Camilo Mora and a team of researchers examined nearly 2,000 case studies between 1980 and 2014 where people died from extreme heat. They then collected climate data from the times and locations of each incident, including temperature, humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed.

The heat threshold: The scientists concluded that when combined with high humidity, moderate temperatures around 90 degrees Fahrenheit became deadly, while continual exposure to conditions above body temperature, 96.8 degrees Fahrenheit, is dangerous. When our bodies get above 104 degrees Fahrenheit, cellular machinery begins to break down, and anything above that requires immediate medical attention.

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Updated 41 mins ago - Politics & Policy

U.S. cities crack down on protesters

The scene near the 5th police precinct during a demonstration calling for justice for George Floyd in Minneapolis on Saturday. Photo: Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

Major U.S. cities have implemented curfews and called on National Guard to mobilize as thousands of demonstrators gather across the nation to continue protesting the death of George Floyd.

The state of play: Hundreds have already been arrested as tensions continue to rise between protesters and local governments. Protesters are setting police cars on fire as freeways remain blocked and windows are shattered, per the Washington Post. Law enforcement officials are using tear gas and rubber bullets to try to disperse crowds and send protesters home.

Journalists get caught in the crosshairs as protests unfold

A man waves a Black Lives Matter flag atop the CNN logo during a protest in response to the police killing of George Floyd outside the CNN Center on May 29. Photo: Elijah Nouvelage / Getty Images

Dozens of journalists across the country tweeted videos Saturday night of themselves and their crews getting arrested, being shot at by police with rubber bullets, targeted with tear gas by authorities or assaulted by protestors.

Why it matters: The incidents show how easy it can be for the media to entangled in the stories they cover, especially during a time of civil unrest.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

George Floyd protests: What you need to know

Photo: David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Clashes erupted between police and protesters in several major U.S. cities Saturday night as demonstrations over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black men spread across the country.

The big picture: Floyd's death in Minneapolis police custody is the latest reminder of the disparities between black and white communities in the U.S. and comes as African Americans grapple with higher death rates from the coronavirus and higher unemployment from trying to stem its spread.