Jun 19, 2017

Deadly heat waves could hit most of the world by 2100

Rick Stevens / AP

By the year 2100, 74% of people on Earth may be exposed to deadly heat waves if nothing is done to address climate change, according to a new study published in Nature. Researchers found that 30% of the world's population is currently at risk from deadly heat and even if we begin to drastically reduce greenhouse gas emissions, 50% will still be at risk.

The study: Lead author Camilo Mora and a team of researchers examined nearly 2,000 case studies between 1980 and 2014 where people died from extreme heat. They then collected climate data from the times and locations of each incident, including temperature, humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed.

The heat threshold: The scientists concluded that when combined with high humidity, moderate temperatures around 90 degrees Fahrenheit became deadly, while continual exposure to conditions above body temperature, 96.8 degrees Fahrenheit, is dangerous. When our bodies get above 104 degrees Fahrenheit, cellular machinery begins to break down, and anything above that requires immediate medical attention.

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Trump to install loyalist Ric Grenell as acting intelligence chief

Photo: Sylvain Gaboury/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images

President Trump confirmed in a tweet Wednesday night that he will install Richard Grenell, the current U.S. ambassador to Germany and a staunch defender of the president, as the acting director of national intelligence.

Why it matters: The role, which was originally vacated by Dan Coats in August 2019, is one of grave responsibility. As acting DNI, Grenell will be charged with overseeing and integrating the U.S. intelligence community and will advise the president and the National Security Council on intelligence matters that concern national security.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 4 mins ago - Politics & Policy

What to watch in the Nevada debate

Photo Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photos: Cengiz Yardages and Mario Tama/Getty Images

Michael Bloomberg's wealth will fuel rather than shield him from tests and attacks when he makes his Democratic primary debate debut on the stage tonight in Las Vegas.

The state of play: Bernie Sanders is still the front-runner. So the other candidates must weigh which of the two presents a bigger threat to their viability: Sanders, with his combined delegate, polling and grassroots momentum? Or Bloomberg, with his bottomless budget?

Go deeperArrowUpdated 10 mins ago - Politics & Policy

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