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Our Expert Voices conversation on de-extinction.

Bringing back extinct species should be treated like any other conservation program — a case-by-case assessment within the context of long-term costs and benefits.

The real questions: How best to go about proceeding with de-extinction considerations? Where will funding come from? What is technically possible? What species do we attempt to de-extinct first? There are a variety of projects in discussion and development globally that aim to de-extinct species or use biotechnology to help endangered species, including: The extinct woolly mammoth, passenger pigeon, Heath hen, New Zealand's Moa, the quagga subspecies of zebra, aurochs and the gastric brooding frog Endangered species like the black-footed ferret, Northern White rhinoceros, and the American chestnut tree. Bottom line: We've already determined de-extinction can be beneficial; it is simply an extension of well-established conservation efforts to reintroduce species with vital ecological functions around the globe (e.g. wolves in Yellowstone National Park, beavers in Scotland, etc). We now need funding for studies to determine how to do it right. Other voices in the conversation: Joseph Bennett, biologist, Carleton University: Keep animals from going extinct in the first place Molly Hardesty-Moore, ecologist, University of California, Santa Barbara: Don't forget an extinct creature's ecology Alejandro Camacho, legal scholar, University of California, Irvine: Wildlife laws aren't ready for the return of extinct species John Hawks, paleoanthropologist, University of Wisconsin-Madison: Bringing back Neanderthals

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The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.

Rep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19

Lou Correa. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) announced on Saturday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Correa is the latest Democratic lawmaker to share his positive test results after last week's deadly Capitol riot. Correa did not shelter in the designated safe zone with his congressional colleagues during the siege, per a spokesperson, instead staying outside to help Capitol Police.

Far-right figure "Baked Alaska" arrested for involvement in Capitol siege

Photo: Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The FBI arrested far-right media figure Tim Gionet, known as "Baked Alaska," on Saturday for his involvement in last week's Capitol riot, according to a statement of facts filed in the U.S. District Court in the District of Columbia.

The state of play: Gionet was arrested in Houston on charges related to disorderly or disruptive conduct on the Capitol grounds or in any of the Capitol buildings with the intent to impede, disrupt, or disturb the orderly conduct of a session, per AP.