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David Rhodes speaks onstage during the 2015 Winter TCA Tour. Photo: JB Lacroix / WireImage

David Rhodes, president of CBS News, told a conference in Jerusalem hosted by Israeli media giant Keshet that the delay behind Anderson Cooper's "60 Minutes" interview with Stormy Daniels is because there's "still a lot of journalistic work to do" rather than the threat of legal action from President Trump, Variety reports. He promised it would air soon, adding, “It’s hard to know [what its impact will be] in advance, especially since so many controversies in the current political environment have not necessarily broken the way you would expect them to."

The big picture: The narrative around Daniels, a porn star who allegedly had an affair with Trump and has since filed a lawsuit against him, isn't going away. Trump's lawyer, Michael Cohen, has said he paid Daniels out of his personal funds as part of a non-disclosure agreement, but Daniels said Trump never signed it and that Cohen was intimidating her "into silence."

More from Rhodes, per Variety:

  • On Charlie Rose's firing, which came after sexual harassment allegations, Rhodes said he asked "CBS This Morning" co-hosts Gayle King and Norah O'Donnell not to script their responses: "It was important to me, as management, that they not feel managed in what they said ... We asked them to address it in their own words however they felt they should."
  • On the "fake news" phenomenon, Rhodes said: "There is not a strong enough effort to clean that up ... The platforms are not doing a good enough job sifting through true and false, and that's a big, big problem."

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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.

Rep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19

Lou Correa. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) announced on Saturday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Correa is the latest Democratic lawmaker to share his positive test results after last week's deadly Capitol riot. Correa did not shelter in the designated safe zone with his congressional colleagues during the siege, per a spokesperson, instead staying outside to help Capitol Police.

Far-right figure "Baked Alaska" arrested for involvement in Capitol siege

Photo: Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The FBI arrested far-right media figure Tim Gionet, known as "Baked Alaska," on Saturday for his involvement in last week's Capitol riot, according to a statement of facts filed in the U.S. District Court in the District of Columbia.

The state of play: Gionet was arrested in Houston on charges related to disorderly or disruptive conduct on the Capitol grounds or in any of the Capitol buildings with the intent to impede, disrupt, or disturb the orderly conduct of a session, per AP.