Aug 17, 2019

Dating apps used for college ID

Tinder as displayed on a smartphone. Photo: Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images

Tinder and Bumble are using college students as a marketing strategy by hosting sponsored parties, recruiting college ambassadors and partnering with fraternities and sororities, the Houston Chronicle reports.

What it looks like: Students at the University of Texas create Tinder University profiles to be admitted to certain fraternity parties, regardless of relationship status. Brand ambassadors give out merchandise at popular college events and offer "safe rides" at UTA, Bumble’s chief creative marketing officer told the Chronicle.

The big picture: "Tinder and Bumble declined to specify the scope of their campus involvement, though both said their apps have college marketing events across the country," per the Chronicle.

  • Students at Tulane University, Northwestern University and Oklahoma University have also attended parties sponsored by the dating apps.

Go deeper: Thanks to Tinder, Match is making a killing on lonely, single millennials

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Esper says he does not support use of military forces to quell protests

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Defense Secretary Mark Esper said at a press briefing Wednesday that he does not support invoking the Insurrection Act, an 1807 law that permits the president to use active-duty troops on U.S. soil, in order to quell protests against racial injustice.

Why it matters: President Trump threatened this week to deploy military forces if state and local governments aren't able to squash violent protests. Axios reported on Wednesday that Trump is backing off the idea for now, but that he hasn't ruled it out.

Venture capital reckons with its racial disparities

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Venture capital is not the primary cause of, nor primary solution to, America's racial inequities. But as a major driver of wealth and opportunity, it does exacerbate them.

How it works: Black men are woefully underrepresented within VC firms at just 2%, based on the most recent data. Black women don't even rank a percentage point.

Private companies cut 2.8 million jobs in May

Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Private companies shed 2.8 million U.S. jobs last month, according to a report from payroll processor ADP and Moody’s Analytics.

Why it matters: It's way less than the nearly 9 million private sector jobs economists estimated would be lost in May, suggesting layoffs during the coronavirus crisis could be slowing sooner than Wall Street expected.