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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The NCAA Division I board of directors approved a plan on Tuesday for fall sports' championships — including FCS football — to be held in the spring.

Why it matters: D-I athletes who saw their fall seasons canceled or postponed due to the pandemic will get to compete for championships.

  • Sports affected: FCS football, men's and women's cross country, men's and women's soccer, field hockey, women's volleyball and men's water polo.

Details: The tournament brackets for the team sports championships will only be filled at 75% of the normal capacity, and the FCS championship will be two-thirds the size — featuring 16 teams instead of the usual 24.

  • FCS schools can determine when they play their games and possibly spread them out over two semesters. The regular season must end by April 17, and the championship will be held sometime between May 14 and 16.
  • The soccer season will begin on Feb. 3, with the NCAA championships taking place from May 13 to 17.

Go deeper

Kendall Baker, author of Sports
Jul 9, 2020 - Sports

College sports stare down a coronavirus-driven disaster in the fall

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Wednesday was the worst day in college sports since March 12, when the coronavirus pandemic shut everything down.

Driving the news: The Ivy League announced that it will cancel all fall sports and will not consider resuming sports until Jan. 1, 2021 — and Stanford is permanently cutting 11 of its 36 varsity sports to help offset a projected $70 million, pandemic-fueled deficit.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
36 mins ago - Economy & Business

How GameStop exposed the market

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Retail traders have found a cheat code for the stock market, and barring some major action from regulatory authorities or a massive turn in their favored companies, they're going to keep using it to score "tendies" and turn Wall Street on its head.

What's happening: The share prices of companies like GameStop are rocketing higher, based largely on the social media organizing of a 3-million strong group of Redditors who are eagerly piling into companies that big hedge funds are short selling, or betting will fall in price.

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
1 hour ago - Health

Who benefits from Biden's move to reopen ACA enrollment

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Nearly 15 million Americans who are currently uninsured are eligible for coverage on the Affordable Care Act marketplaces, and more than half of them would qualify for subsidies, according to a new Kaiser Family Foundation brief.

Why it matters: President Biden is expected to announce today that he'll be reopening the marketplaces for a special enrollment period from Feb. 15 to May 15, but getting a significant number of people to sign up for coverage will likely require targeted outreach.