Jan 14, 2020

Booker's departure leaves a nuclear energy gap in 2020 race

Cory Booker. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Sen. Cory Booker's exit from the 2020 White House race means the field is losing a nuclear advocate whose views clashed with some top contenders.

The big picture: The Washington Examiner's Abby Smith points out that Booker "didn’t hold back in his criticism of his Democratic counterparts skeptical of nuclear energy’s role in a low-carbon future."

  • Her item cites Booker's comments in a September HuffPost interview that highlighted his differences with Bernie Sanders and to a lesser degree Elizabeth Warren.

What he said: "As much as we say the Republicans when it comes to climate change must listen to science, our party has the same obligation to listen to scientists," Booker said.

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Cory Booker open to VP nomination

One day after ending his presidential campaign, Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) told "CBS This Morning" on Tuesday that he won't, if offered, rule out the opportunity to be a vice presidential nominee on the 2020 ticket, but noted that he's focused on New Jersey.

The big picture: Booker, who made the shortlist when Hillary Clinton ran for president in 2016, joins former presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris as a young, diverse option for the Democratic nominee's running mate in the 2020 race.

Go deeper... Booker: "There's more billionaires in the race than there are black people"

Keep ReadingArrowJan 14, 2020

Scoop: Trump's budget calls for major boost to nukes

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President Trump will request a major increase to the budget for America's nuclear weapons arsenal, according to people familiar with the budget request the administration will unveil on Monday.

By the numbers: Trump's 2021 budget calls for $28.9 billion for the Pentagon to modernize nuclear delivery systems and $19.8 billion to the National Nuclear Security Administration — a nearly 20% increase over his previous budget request — for "modernizing the nuclear weapons stockpile," according to people familiar with the budget request.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Feb 9, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Microsoft, House GOP reflect split-screen America on climate change

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Microsoft is pushing aggressive goals to tackle climate change while simultaneously supporting House Republicans' more modest efforts on the matter.

Driving the news: On Thursday, Microsoft announced its new pledge to become carbon negative in 10 years, while earlier in the week its president, Brad Smith, expressed support for House Republicans’ far narrower efforts on climate.

Go deeperArrowJan 17, 2020