A trial COVID-19 vaccine. Photo: Silvio Avila/AFP via Getty Images

35% of Americans say they would refuse a coronavirus vaccine, even if it was free, approved by the Food and Drug Administration and available immediately, according to a Gallup poll released Friday.

The big picture: Health experts believe a vaccine — coupled with recommended public health measures — will be the path back to societal normalcy. But that outcome relies on a critical mass getting the vaccine so that the population can achieve herd immunity.

  • Many Americans, however, are split along party lines as to whether they'd be willing to obtain a vaccine for COVID-19.
  • 81% of Democrats said they would be willing to have a vaccine, while 47% of Republicans said the same.
  • Independents fell in the middle, with 59% reporting they would get vaccinated for the coronavirus.

By the numbers: Age and race are also strong predictors of a person's likelihood to be treated with a vaccine.

  • White Americans reported 67% willingness to get vaccinated, while non-white Americans reported a 59% likelihood.
  • 76% of 18-29-year-olds reported willingness to receive a vaccine, as well as 70% of those 65 and older.
  • But middle-aged Americans between 30-49 years old and 50-64-year-olds reported only 64% and 59% willingness, respectively.

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