Get the latest market trends in your inbox

Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with the Axios Markets newsletter. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Doctors continue to learn about more the scary and surprising symptoms of the coronavirus as the pandemic rages on, the Washington Post reports.

Why it matters: The respiratory harm, as we all know, is very bad. But that's also what doctors and scientists were expecting to see when COVID-19 first emerged. They've also been taken aback by a raft of unexpected, harder-to-explain health effects.

  • In addition to coughing and a fever, potential symptoms are now believed to include, for some patients, a loss of smell, purple toes, pinkeye, vomiting and diarrhea.
  • And in addition to attacking patients' lungs, doctors now believe COVID-19 can cause strokes, kidney damage and problems with the immune system, and can weaken the muscles in the heart.
  • It also seems to be infecting more children than expected.

Between the lines: The virus appears to do major damage to blood cells, which likely helps explain why it's able to attack so many of the body's systems, and its damage to the heart in particular, the Post reports.

Related: Many doctors are now second-guessing the use of ventilators, because some coronavirus patients are able to function just fine even with oxygen levels so low that they should be unconscious, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Go deeper: The coronavirus is a moving target — and that has implications for a vaccine

Go deeper

Aug 19, 2020 - Health

WHO says young people are driving the spread of coronavirus

Students in Boulder, Colorado, on Aug. 18. Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

The World Health Organization warned at a news briefing on Tuesday that "people in their 20s, 30s and 40s" are increasingly the primary spreaders of the coronavirus.

Why it matters: The words of caution come as schools and colleges across the United States weigh the risks of in-person classes, which could exacerbate the trend of young people transmitting the virus.

Updated Oct 7, 2020 - Health

World coronavirus updates

Expand chart
Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Axios Visuals

New Zealand now has active no coronavirus cases in the community after the final six people linked to the Auckland cluster recovered, the country's Health Ministry confirmed in an email Wednesday.

The big picture: The country's second outbreak won't officially be declared closed until there have been "no new cases for two incubation periods," the ministry said. Auckland will join the rest of NZ in enjoying no domestic restrictions from late Wednesday, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said, declaring that NZ had "beat the virus again."

Aug 18, 2020 - Health

Notre Dame cancels in-person classes after surge of COVID-19 cases

Photo: Nicole Abbett/NHLI via Getty Images

The University of Notre Dame announced Tuesday that it is canceling in-person classes for at least two weeks following a spike in coronavirus cases.

Why it matters: Notre Dame is the second prominent university to announce this week that it would revert back to remote learning, following the the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on Tuesday. The reversals underscore the challenges facing colleges and universities as more students are set return to campus.