A deserted downtown in Rockton, Illinois. Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

The $349 billion cap for small business loans for the coronavirus stimulus was reached Thursday, taking less than two weeks to run out.

Why it matters: While it's a sign that more than 1.6 million small businesses (and some larger ones) will eventually get desperately needed cash, it's now officially a sign that more is needed.

  • Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans are forgivable if used for payroll and rent and similar expenses, and they're designed to keep otherwise healthy businesses afloat during this crisis.

The big picture: In roughly a month, coronavirus lockdowns have...

  1. Caused more than 1 in 10 working-age Americans to file for unemployment.
  2. Put historic pressure on businesses not initially affected by the lockdown, with a second wave of layoffs hitting nationwide. (WSJ)

The state of play, via Axios' Alayna Treene: Democrats and Republicans are still in a stalemate over how big an interim stimulus package should be — with both sides digging in deeper to their respective positions last night.

  • Republicans continue to argue that the most urgent need is to add money to the PPP, and that they can negotiate other funding measures once that’s passed.
  • Meanwhile, Democrats are insisting that the bill should include money for hospitals and state and local governments, citing mayors and governors who have pleaded for more federal aid.

What's next: House and Senate aides familiar with the talks say now that the fund is depleted, the pressure to come to a compromise is greater than ever to deliver emergency funding, and are confident they will reach an agreement soon. 

  • Some Trump administration officials say they’d be open to accepting more money for hospitals in order to get the $251 billion in small-business funding they've requested.
  • Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and members of his staff are scheduled to resume talks with Senate Democratic and House majority leadership today to try and hammer out an agreement.

Go deeper

The silver linings of online school

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Online learning can be frustrating for students, teachers and parents, but some methods are working.

The big picture: Just as companies are using this era of telework to try new things, some principals, teachers and education startups are treating remote learning as a period of experimentation, too.

Updated 10 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9:45 p.m. ET: 19,282,972 — Total deaths: 718,851 — Total recoveries — 11,671,491Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9:45 p.m. ET: 4,937,441 — Total deaths: 161,248 — Total recoveries: 1,623,870 — Total tests: 60,415,558Map.
  3. Politics: Trump says he's prepared to sign executive orders on coronavirus aid.
  4. Education: Cuomo says all New York schools can reopen for in-person learning.
  5. Public health: Surgeon general urges flu shots to prevent "double whammy" with coronavirus — Massachusetts pauses reopening after uptick in coronavirus cases.
  6. World: Africa records over 1 million coronavirus cases — Gates Foundation puts $150 million behind coronavirus vaccine production.

Warren and Clinton to speak on same night of Democratic convention

(Photos: Abdulhamid Hosbas/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images, Sean Rayford/Getty Images)

Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Hillary Clinton both are slated to speak on the Wednesday of the Democratic convention — Aug. 19 — four sources familiar with the planning told Axios.

Why it matters: That's the same night Joe Biden's running mate (to be revealed next week) will address the nation. Clinton and Warren represent two of the most influential wise-women of Democratic politics with the potential to turn out millions of establishment and progressive voters in November.