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Axios chief technology correspondent Ina Fried (L) and Jonah Edelman, co-founder and CEO of Stand for Children. Screenshot: Axios

Children's advocate Jonah Edelman is offering three recommendations for schools to keep students from falling through the cracks during remote learning.

What he's saying: The co-founder and CEO of Stand for Children favors every middle and high school student having an adviser, teachers or advisers holding virtual home visits at the start of the semester, and removing "zeroes" from grading systems. He made his comments during an Axios virtual event on Friday.

  • "There should be a connection between school and home that's very solid," Edelman said, adding that, "there's things that school districts can do to mitigate the potential damage."

Driving the news: With coronavirus cases spiking in many parts of the U.S., districts are weighing the feasibility of keeping classes all virtual or rotating in-person and remote lessons, Axios' Kim Hart and Marisa Fernandez report.

Go deeper ... WSJ: Students and teachers flunked remote learning

Go deeper

Updated 12 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Health: CDC director defends agency's response to pandemic — CDC warns highly transmissible coronavirus variant could become dominant in U.S. in March.
  2. Politics: Empire State Building among hundreds to light up in Biden inauguration coronavirus tribute.
  3. Vaccine: Fauci: 100 million doses in 100 days is "absolutely" doable.
  4. Economy: Unemployment filings explode again.
  5. Tech: Kids' screen time sees a big increase.
Updated Oct 25, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Trumpworld coronavirus tracker

Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

An outbreak of COVID-19 has struck the White House — including the president himself — just weeks before the 2020 election.

Why it matters: If the president can get infected, anyone can. And the scramble to figure out the scope of this outbreak is a high-profile, high-stakes microcosm of America's larger failures to contain the virus and to stand up a contact-tracing system that can respond to new cases before they have a chance to become outbreaks.

Woman who allegedly stole laptop from Pelosi's office to sell to Russia is arrested

Photo: FBI

A woman accused of breaching the Capitol and planning to sell to Russia a laptop or hard drive she allegedly stole from Speaker Nancy Pelosi's office was arrested in Pennsylvania's Middle District Monday, the Department of Justice said.

Driving the news: Riley June Williams, 22, is charged with illegally entering the Capitol as well as violent entry and disorderly conduct. She has not been charged over the laptop allegation and the case remains under investigation, per the DOJ.