Photo: RJ Sangosti/The Denver Post via Getty Images

The pandemic will "expedite peak oil demand," the consultancy Rystad Energy said in a note this week, taking stock of how much additional oil will not be produced in the future as a result.

Why it matters: Rystad's summary of its annual review of oil resources shows how the coronavirus pandemic is prompting analysts to change their thinking about the future of oil.

The big picture: The consultancy told Axios they see oil demand bouncing back to exceed pre-pandemic levels, but now projects demand peaking at roughly 106.5 million–107 million bpd in 2027–2028, as opposed to 107.5 million bpd in 2030 under a prior forecast.

What's next: The accelerated peak will curtail some oil exploration efforts, Rystad said.

  • “Non-OPEC countries account for the lion’s share of 'lost' recoverable resources with more than 260 billion barrels of undiscovered oil now more likely to be left untouched, especially in remote exploratory areas,” Per Magnus Nysveen, Rystad's head of analysis, said in a statement.

Go deeper: Coronavirus drives crude oil owners to hunt around for alternative storage

Go deeper

Amazon defends working with oil companies to reach its zero-carbon goal

Kara Hurst in Seattle.

Partnering with oil and gas producers is necessary for Amazon and other companies to achieve their climate goals, the tech giant's chief of sustainability, Kara Hurst, said during an Axios virtual event on Thursday.

The big picture: Amazon aims to hit carbon neutrality in 2040, 10 years earlier than the Paris climate accord. The company plans to reach its goal in part by helping companies develop climate-friendly technologies through a $2 billion venture fund. The first recipients were announced on Thursday.

FDA chief vows agency will not accept political pressure on coronavirus vaccine

Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Stephen Hahn promised that "science will guide our decision" for a coronavirus vaccine at a Senate hearing on Wednesday.

Why it matters: More Americans are expressing doubt about a first-generation vaccine, despite President Trump's efforts to push an unrealistic timeline that conflicts with medical experts in his administration.

CEO confidence rises for the first time in over 2 years

Data: Business Roundtable; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

A closely-watched CEO economic confidence index rose for the first time after declining for nine straight quarters, according to a survey of 150 chief executives of the biggest U.S. companies by trade group Business Roundtable.

Why it matters: The index, which still remains at a decade low, reflects corporate America's expectations for sales, hiring and spending — which plummeted amid uncertainty when the pandemic hit.

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