May 2, 2020 - Politics & Policy

In photos: Blue Angels and Thunderbirds pay tribute to coronavirus caregivers

The Blue Angels and U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds fly over the National Mall on May 2 in Washington, DC. Photo: Paul Morigi/Getty Images

The U.S. Navy Blue Angels and Air Force Thunderbirds paid tribute to first responders and other health care workers on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic, flying over Baltimore, Washington and Atlanta on Saturday.

The big picture: Health care workers are at especially high risk of catching the coronavirus, because of their prolonged exposure to patients who have it. Between 10% and 20% of doctors, nurses and other health care workers are infected, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found in mid-April.

A crowd lingers on a hill in Baltimore, Maryland, after watching the Thunderbirds and Blue Angels perform a flyover on May 2. Photo: Rob Carr/Getty Images
People gather in a park to watch the Blue Angels and Thunderbirds fly over Washington, D.C. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images
The Blue Angels and Air Force Thunderbirds fly around Atlanta's Centennial Olympic Park on May 2. Photo: Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images
The Blue Angels and Air Force Thunderbirds fly over Atlanta on May 2. Photo: Paras Griffin/Getty Images
A crowd watches in Baltimore, Maryland, on May 2. Photo: Rob Carr/Getty Images
The Blue Angels and Thunderbirds streak through the skies over Washington, D.C. on May 2. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images
The Blue Angels and Thunderbirds climb behind the Washington Monument on May 2. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images
The Blue Angels and Thunderbirds jet over the Lincoln Memorial on May 2. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Go deeper: Navy Blue Angels and Air Force Thunderbirds to tour for national unity

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In photos: George Floyd protests continue to grip the nation

A protestor in Washington, D.C. on Monday. Photo: Joshua Roberts/Getty Images

Protests over the death of George Floyd continued to spread across America on Monday as President Trump threatened to deploy military personnel if civil unrest continued.

The state of play: Protests have faced striking violence, including the use of tear gas, flash bangs, physical force and rubber bullets by law enforcement. Fires sparked as part of demonstrations have engulfed businesses and public property. Mayors have imposed curfews to curb protestors from late-night demonstrations.

Updated Jun 1, 2020 - World

In photos: People around the world show support for George Floyd

British activists gather at London's Trafalgar Square during the George Floyd demonstration on Sunday. Photo: David Cliff/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

From Canada to New Zealand, people have turned out in their thousands to rally against racism and show their support for U.S. demonstrators protesting the death in police custody of George Floyd — mainly outside American embassies.

Why it matters: The tense situation in the U.S. has brought the discussion of racism and discrimination onto the global stage at a time when most of the world is consumed by the novel coronavirus.

Updated 4 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Trump says RNC is looking outside of North Carolina for convention site

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper in 2018. Photo: Sara D. Davis/Getty Images

President Trump tweeted on Tuesday night that because of ongoing coronavirus restrictions in North Carolina, the Republican Party will be "forced to seek another state" to host its convention in August.

The big picture: The late-night tweet came after North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper (D) told convention organizers earlier Tuesday that Republicans should plan for a "scaled-down convention with fewer people, social distancing and face coverings" given the impact of the pandemic.