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Photo: Misha Friedman/Getty Images

A new study of coronavirus patients discharged from a hospital in Wuhan, China, found that most participants had at least one symptom six months later, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: The study, published in The Lancet, is a stark reminder that death isn't the only thing to fear from the virus.

Details: Of the 1,733 patients included in the study, more than three-quarters of them had lingering symptoms, including fatigue, insomnia, depression, anxiety or diminished lung function.

  • Exhaustion or muscle weakness was the most common ongoing issue.
  • Although the patients were sick enough to be hospitalized, the vast majority did not need ventilators or high-flow nasal oxygen, meaning they weren't the most severely ill patients.

Go deeper

15 hours ago - Health

One year of the coronavirus

One year ago today, a novel coronavirus was barely beginning to catch the public's eye. There were just over 2,000 confirmed cases worldwide, mostly in China, and five cases in the U.S.

The big picture: The sea of red says it all. Today, there have been over 100 million cases worldwide, led by the U.S. with 25 million.

15 hours ago - Health

Bill and Melinda Gates warn of "immunity inequality"

Bill and Melinda Gates at a Goalkeepers event in 2018. Photo: Ludovic Marin/AFP via Getty Images

Bill and Melinda Gates warned in their annual letter Wednesday that the lasting legacy of the coronavirus pandemic could be "immunity inequality" — a wide and deadly gap between wealthy people, with easy access to coronavirus vaccines, and everyone else.

Why it matters: As long as there are large swaths of the world that can't get vaccinated, they warned, it will be impossible to get the pandemic under control.

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
15 hours ago - Health

Vaccine hesitancy is decreasing in the U.S.

Reproduced from KFF ; Chart: Axios Visuals

An increasing number of Americans say they want to get the coronavirus vaccine as soon as possible, per new KFF polling.

Yes, but: Race, partisanship and geography still serve as major dividing lines for vaccine enthusiasm. And people of color are less likely than white Americans to say they have been vaccinated themselves or know someone who has.