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Coral reef fish choose to eat in crowds

Associated Press

Coral reef fish take note of what others are eating, a behavior that can affect sensitive reef environments. Scientists from the University of California-Davis and Princeton studied fish grazing around coral reefs in French Polynesia and found that fish decide to feed on algae if they see lots of other fish in the same place. But if there aren't any other fish nearby, they take it as a sign that predators are close and avoid that section of the reef.

Why it matters: Fish keep the growth of algae, which can harm coral reefs, in check. Overfishing threatens that balance not just because there are simply less fish consuming algae but because fish interpret the presence of fewer fish as a risk when there may not be one. The researchers suggest the newly-revealed link between the social interactions of fish and how food and energy flow through the reef should inform how these sensitive environments, distressed by climate change, are managed.

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Trump: Transgender people "disqualified" from the military

SecDef Jim Mattis and Gen. Joseph Dunford.
Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis and Gen. Joseph Dunford. Photo: Andrew Harrer-Pool / Getty Images

President Trump late Friday issued an order disqualifying most transgender people from serving in the military.

"[T]ransgender persons with a history or diagnosis of gender dysphoria -- individuals who the policies state may require substantial medical treatment, including medications and surgery -- are disqualified from military service except under certain limited circumstances."

Why it matters: Anything short of an inclusive policy for transgender troops will be viewed as a continuation of the ban Trump announced on Twitter in August.

Haley Britzky 3 hours ago
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Both Bush and Obama also requested line item veto power

Donald Trump.
Photo: Mark Wilson / Getty Images

President Trump tweeted on Friday evening that to avoid having "this omnibus situation from ever happening again," he wants Congress to re-instate "a line-item veto."

Why it matters: This would allow him to veto specific parts of a bill without getting rid of the entire thing. Trump was deeply unhappy with the $1.3 trillion spending bill approved by Congress early Friday morning, but signed it anyway on Friday afternoon.