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Stoneman Douglas students returned to class two weeks after the mass shooting. Photo: Joe Raedle / Getty Images

After the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., 638 copycat threats were reported from February 15 to February 27, according to USA Today. The top states were Texas with 55, Ohio with 47, California with 37, Florida with 35 and Pennsylvania with 32.

Happening today: The White House takes its next steps on school safety, per Lindsay Walters, White House deputy press secretary:

"As we continue to work towards creating school safety programs that protect all children, the President will be meeting with video game industry leaders and Members of Congress [Roosevelt Room, 2 p.m.] to discuss violent video-game exposure and the correlation to aggression and desensitization in children."
  • "This meeting will be the first of many with industry leaders to discuss this important issue.”
  • Expected attendees include Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), Rep. Vicky Hartzler (R-M0.) and Rep. Martha Roby (R-Ala.)
  • Outside participants include Strauss Zelnick, Take-Two Interactive, CEO of Rockstar Games; Brent Bozell, Media Research Center; Lt. Col. Dave Grossman (Ret.), director of Killology Research Group; Pat Vance, president of Entertainment Software Rating Board; Mike Gallagher, President and CEO, Entertainment Software Association; Robert Altman, chairman and CEO of ZeniMax Media; and Melissa Henson, Mother from Parents Television Council.

Go deeper

Updated 6 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Large coronavirus outbreaks leading to high death rates — Coronavirus cases are at an all-time high ahead of Election Day — U.S. tops 88,000 COVID-19 cases, setting new single-day record.
  2. Politics: States beg for Warp Speed billions.
  3. World: Taiwan reaches a record 200 days with no local coronavirus cases.
  4. 🎧Podcast: The vaccine race turns toward nationalism.

Technical glitch in Facebook's ad tools creates political firestorm

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. Photo: SOPA Images / Contributor

Facebook said late Thursday that a mix of "technical problems" and confusion among advertisers around its new political ad ban rules caused issues affecting ad campaigns of both parties.

Why it matters: A report out Thursday morning suggested the ad tools were causing campaign ads, even those that adhered to Facebook's new rules, to be paused. Very quickly, political campaigners began asserting the tech giant was enforcing policies in a way that was biased against their campaigns.

7 hours ago - Health

States beg for Warp Speed billions

A COVID-19 drive-thru testing center yesterday at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens. Photo: David Santiago/Miami Herald via AP

Operation Warp Speed has an Achilles' heel: States need billions to distribute vaccines — and many say they don't have the cash.

Why it matters: The first emergency use authorization could come as soon as next month, but vaccines require funding for workers, shipping and handling, and for reserving spaces for vaccination sites.