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Photo: Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images

As the threat of a full blown trade war gets more realistic, companies are working to counter it, Reuters reports.

The big picture: They don't want any confrontation with President Trump, per CNBC, but "want to exert as much influence as they can" to convince him not to enter into a serious trade battle.

Amazon is pushing for more intense government lobbying, and "discussing industry-wide advertising campaigns."

Toyota Motor North America sent workers to a rally in D.C. this week, and the head of the branch is meeting with lawmakers to discuss tariffs.

General Motors executives have also been meeting with lawmakers and the administration.

Alcoa, an aluminum producer, told investors that it's in "active discussions" with the Department of Commerce, lawmakers, and the administration.

One image of success is Apple, CNBC reports, as it has received guarantees from the administration that "iPhones would ship from China without being subject to tariffs."

Go deeper

Texas AG sues Biden administration over deportation freeze

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton speaks to members of the media in 2016. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is suing the Biden administration in federal district court over its 100-day freeze on deporting unauthorized immigrants, and he's asking for a temporary restraining order.

Between the lines: The freeze went into effect Friday, temporarily halting most immigration enforcement in the U.S. In the lawsuit, Paxton claims the move "violates the U.S. Constitution, federal immigration and administrative law, and a contractual agreement between Texas" and the Department of Homeland Security.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
1 hour ago - Podcasts

Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck

President Biden has said that getting Americans vaccinated for COVID-19 is his administration’s top priority given an initial rollout plagued by organizational, logistical and technical glitches.

Axios Re:Cap digs into the bottlenecks and how to unclog them with Carbon Health chief executive Eren Bali, whose company recently began helping to manage vaccinations in Los Angeles.