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Companies consider blockchain to keep an eye on food

AP

As people become more interested in understanding where their food is coming from, blockchain technologies are being eyed as a way to track and record the source of food from the farm to the dining room table, Bloomberg reports.

  • Blockchain is a shared, cryptographically secure ledger of transactions.
  • It's a growing business opportunity in China, where food fraud can be a big problem.
  • Why it matters: Michigan State University"s Food Fraud Initiative says fraud costs the global food industry as much as $40 billion annually. Pew Research Center found that 40 percent of Chinese see food safety is a "very big problem," up from 12% in 2008.