Mike Allen
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Axios AM

Happy Black Friday, and happy leftovers.

Bulletin: "At least 155 people were killed and another 120 injured in an attack on a mosque in Egypt's North Sinai region," CNN reports. "After an explosion, gunmen ... waiting outside ... opened fire at worshipers as they fled Friday prayers."

WashPost Sports lead headline, on Redskins' 20-10 Thanksgiving night victory over hapless Giants at FedEx Field, keeping playoff hopes alive: "Better to receive."

1 big thing: New signs of Flynn flip

Trump appears with Flynn during a town hall in Virginia Beach in September, 2016. (AP's Evan Vucci)

"Lawyers for Michael T. Flynn, President Trump's former national security adviser, notified the president's legal team in recent days that they could no longer discuss [Mueller's] investigation ... an indication that Mr. Flynn is cooperating with prosecutors or negotiating a deal," per the N.Y. Times' lead story:

  • "Flynn's lawyers had been sharing information with Mr. Trump's lawyers ... That agreement has been terminated."
  • "Defense lawyers frequently share information during investigations, but ... [i]t is unethical for lawyers to work together when one client is cooperating with prosecutors."
  • What it means: "The notification alone does not prove that Mr. Flynn is cooperating ... Still, the notification led Mr. Trump's lawyers to believe that Mr. Flynn — who, along with his son, is seen as having significant criminal exposure — has, at the least, begun discussions with Mr. Mueller about cooperating."
  • Why it matters: 'A deal with Mr. Flynn would give Mr. Mueller a behind-the-scenes look at the Trump campaign and the early tumultuous weeks of the administration. Mr. Flynn was an early and important adviser to Mr. Trump ... and an advocate of closer ties with Russia."

P.S. All three congressional Russia/election probes — Senate and House Intelligence, and Senate Judiciary committees — are likely to continue into 2018, according to AP's Mary Clare Jalonick:

  • "The panels have obtained thousands of pages of documents from Trump's campaign and other officials, and have done dozens of interviews."
  • "All three committees have focused on a June 2016 meeting that Trump campaign officials held in Trump Tower with a Russian lawyer."

2. Article of the day

Trump meets with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov (left) and then-Russian Ambassador to the U.S. Sergei Kislyak at the White House on May 10. (Russian Foreign Ministry photo, via AP)

Astonishing reporting from Vanity Fair's The Hive, by Howard Blum ... "What Trump ... told Kisylak after Comey was canned ... During a May 10 meeting in the Oval Office, the president betrayed his intelligence community by leaking the content of a classified, and highly sensitive, Israeli intelligence operation to two high-ranking Russian envoys, Sergey Kislyak and Sergey Lavrov":

  • Israeli spies and counterterrorism forces had discovered that "ISIS terrorists were working on transforming laptop computers into bombs that could pass undetected through airport security." That led to new U.S. and British restrictions on flights from abroad.
  • "[T]he Israeli mission was praised by [the American espionage community] as a casebook example of a valued ally's hard-won field intelligence being put to good, arguably even lifesaving, use."
  • "Yet this triumph would be overshadowed ... when ... Trump revealed details about the classified mission" to the Russian officials in in the Oval.
  • Why it matters: "[F]resh blood was spilled in [Trump's] long-running combative relationship with the nation's clandestine services. Israel ... would rethink its willingness to share raw intelligence, and pretty much the entire Free World was left shaking its collective head in bewilderment."
  • Listen in.

P.S. Paul Manafort took at least 138 trips to Ukraine between 2004 and 2015 while consulting for Russian and pro-Russian oligarchs, McClatchy's Peter Stone and Greg Gordon report:

  • "As the GOP platform committee drew up party positions a week before the Republican National Convention, a plank calling for the United States to provide 'lethal weapons' for Ukraine's defense was altered in a controversial and mysterious move."
  • An "American consultant in Ukraine said that Manafort ... had boasted he played a role in easing the language."
  • "Charlie Black, a onetime partner of Manafort's, says he remains baffled by the change. 'It was inexplicable to me that a majority of platform members would have taken a pro-Russian position on Ukraine.'"

3. Axios special: Future of retail

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser / Axios

2017 was retail's year of reckoning: The Amazon revolution is one symptom of the growing dominance of mega tech firms that are changing the way America works and shops.
Axios Expert Voices Editor Chris Russell fills our cart with a Black Friday Future of Retail stream.

Bonus: Inside Mar-a-Lago

AP's Alex Brandon

President Trump holds a video conference with members of the armed forces, on Thanksgiving at his private club, Mar-a-Lago, in Palm Beach.

4. Stat du jour: Young farmers

AP's LM Otero

"For only the second time in the last century, the number of farmers under 35 years old is increasing, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's latest Census of Agriculture," the WashPost's Caitlin Downey reports in a front-pager with the lovely headline, "A growing movement":

  • 69% of the surveyed young farmers had college degrees — significantly higher than the general population.
  • Why it matters: "This new generation can't hope to replace the numbers that farming is losing to age. But it is already contributing to the growth of the local-food movement and could help preserve the place of midsize farms in the rural landscape."
  • Where it's happening: "In some states, such as California, Nebraska and South Dakota, the number of beginning farmers has grown by 20 percent or more."
  • The millennials are "far more likely than the general farming population to grow organically, limit pesticide and fertilizer use, diversify their crops or animals, and be deeply involved in... farmers markets."

5. "I crossed a line for some women"

Franken during an interview last year (AP's J. Scott Applewhite)

Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) issues a Thanksgiving afternoon apology following new groping allegations:
  • "I've met tens of thousands of people and taken thousands of photographs, often in crowded and chaotic situations. I'm a warm person; I hug people. I've learned from recent stories that in some of those encounters, I crossed a line for some women — and I know that any number is too many."
  • "Some women have found my greetings or embraces for a hug or photo inappropriate, and I respect their feelings about that. I've thought a lot in recent days about how that could happen, and recognize that I need to be much more careful and sensitive in these situations. I feel terribly that I've made some women feel badly and for that I am so sorry, and I want to make sure that never happens again."
  • "And let me say again to Minnesotans that I'm sorry for putting them through this and I'm committed to regaining their trust."
What's next? Minneapolis Star Tribune: "A spokesman said Franken will speak with the media on Sunday."
The backdrop ... "Franken's rising political star obscured by accusations," by AP's Alan Fram and Kyle Potter:
  • "After spending much of his nearly nine years as senator trying to shed his funnyman image and quietly digging into issues like internet access and consumer protection, he was now a draw at political events and mentioned by some as a 2020 presidential possibility."
  • "Months of savaging some of President Donald Trump's appointees had turned the Harvard-educated Franken into a weapon of choice for Democrats eager to attack the administration and energize party voters."

6. Last straw for Uber?

AP's Richard Vogel

Uber's "latest misbehavior involving a data breach cover-up revealed this week could be the impetus for people to ride elsewhere," according to AP's Tom Krisher in Detroit and tech writer Barbara Ortutay:

  • "[R]iders have fled from the service before, but enough have stayed because of the Uber's convenience."
  • "[T]his week the state of Colorado fined Uber $8.9 million for allowing employees with serious criminal or motor vehicle offenses to drive for the company. Then came the stolen data, which has touched off more government inquiries."
  • Why it matters: Polling by Brand Keys Inc., a New York-based customer research firm, "found that in 2015 Lyft passed Uber as the most trusted of ride-hailing brands, and trust in Uber has been eroding ever since."

7. Worthy of your time

AP's Cliff Owen

David Brooks on "America: The Redeemer Nation":

  • "Today, we have no common national narrative, no shared way of interpreting the flow of events. Without a common story, we don't know what our national purpose is. We have no common set of goals or ideals."
  • "We need a new national narrative."
  • "The story of America ... can be interpreted as a series of redemptions, of injury, suffering and healing fresh starts."
  • In Lincoln's Second Inaugural, in 1865, he "realistically acknowledges the divisions and disappointments that plague the nation. But he does not accept the inevitability of a house divided."
  • "This is a story we can join and live into."

Also on the N.Y. Times Op-Ed page ... Tom Friedman from Riyadh, "Saudi Arabia's Arab Spring, at Last: The crown prince has big plans to bring back a level of tolerance to his society":

  • "I never thought I'd live long enough to write this sentence: The most significant reform process underway anywhere in the Middle East today is in Saudi Arabia."
  • "Unlike the other Arab Springs ... this one is led from the top down by the country's 32-year-old crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman," MBS.
  • "[I]f it succeeds, it will not only change the character of Saudi Arabia but the tone and tenor of Islam across the globe."
  • "Only a fool would predict its success — but only a fool would not root for it."

8. Real world

AP's Bernat Armangue

This aerial photo shows the Kutupalong Rohingya refugee camp in Bangladesh, housing Rohingya Muslims who fled across their mutual border to escape violence.

  • How it happened: More than 620,000 Rohingya have fled from Myanmar into Bangladesh since Aug. 25, when the army began what it called "clearance operations" following an attack on police posts by a group of Rohingya insurgents.

9. "A hated tax but a fair one"

Courtesy The Economist

"Inheritance tax ... The case for taxing inherited assets is strong," The Economist writes in its global cover editorial:

  • The reality: "Inheritance tax is routinely seen as the least fair by Britons and Americans. This hostility spans income brackets.
  • The argument: "Unlike income taxes, they do not destroy the incentive to work ... Unlike capital-gains taxes, heavier estate taxes do not seem to dissuade saving or investment. Unlike sales taxes, they are progressive. To the extent that a higher inheritance tax can fund cuts to all other taxes, the system can be more efficient."
  • A recipe: "First, target the wealthy; that means taxing inheritors rather than estates and setting a meaningful exemption threshold. Second, keep it simple. Close loopholes for those who are caught in the net by setting a flat rate and by giving people a lifetime allowance for bequests ... Third, with the fiscal headroom generated by higher inheritance tax, reduce other taxes, lightening the load for most."

10. 1 shop thing

AP's Charlie Riedel

Aren't you glad this isn't you? Antsy shoppers wait for a Best Buy to open on Thanksgiving in Overland Park, Kansas.

AP reports that Hatchimals are hot:

  • "Black Friday has morphed from a single day ... into a whole season of deals, so shoppers may feel less need to be out."
  • Forecast: "With the jobless rate at a 17-year-low of 4.1% and consumer confidence stronger than a year ago, analysts project healthy sales increases ... The National Retail Federation ... expects sales ... to at least match last year's rise of 3.6% and estimates online spending and other non-store sales will rise 11 to 15%."
  • Stunning stat: "Analysts at Bain say Amazon is expected to take half of the holiday season's sales growth."

Featured

Axios PM

Happy afternoon. I hope you're enjoying your 🦃 day, and the long weekend ahead. PM is short and sweet today, so you can get caught up and back to relaxation.

1 big thing: Trump Thanksgiving

President Trump stopped by a Coast Guard station in Florida today, saying he was "very proud" of the entire branch, particularly after rescue efforts from Hurricane Harvey:

  • "If you were looking at it as a brand, there's no brand that went up more than the Coast Guard, with what happened in Texas."
  • Trump also addressed U.S. service members stationed abroad by video conference today, telling them they're "very, very special people to me, and to everyone in this country."
  • His overall message: The military is succeeding because he's letting them "fight to win," and the economy back home is doing great too.

The Trumps' Thanksgiving Day menu, per the White House pool: "turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes and gravy, sweet potatoes w marshmallows, a variety of baked goods, local produce and cheeses, red snapper and Florida stone crab."

2. What you missed

Trump speaks with members of the armed forces via video conference. Photo: Alex Brandon / AP

  1. Vice President Mike Pence is planning to give a landmark speech at the Knesset — the Israeli Parliament — during his trip to Israel in Mid-December. Details.
  2. Zimbabwe's military has granted ousted dictator Robert Mugabe immunity from prosecution and guaranteed the safety of his family. More.
  3. Trump's politics-first approach to sexual misconduct allegations. The background.
  4. For the first time, scientists have used a cell to record what happens in the world around it. They were able to retrieve the information and read it in chronological order. The story.

3. One sobering thing

Our top 10, also featured in Axios AM, on the extent of polarization in America.

Dig in.

Featured

Axios AM

Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours! Situational awareness: Vice President Pence will give a landmark speech at the Knesset — the Israeli Parliament — during his trip to Israel in Mid-December, the well-wired Barak Ravid of Israel's Channel 10 News reports for Axios.

1 big thing: Thank you

Autumn leaves float as rain falls yesterday in Brookline, Mass. (AP's Michael Dwyer)

Thank you for joining me for Year 1 of Axios AM. It's the funnest job I've ever had, mainly because of my innovative, creative, enjoyable Axios colleagues, who had the faith and guts to join Jim VandeHei, Roy Schwartz and me on this untested adventure — only to see it take off like a rocket.

  • The other biggest reason is you, the readers of Axios AM, the world's most interesting and consequential breakfast conversation. Thank you for enlightening me, encouraging me, pushing me, correcting me.
  • AM comes from my real email (mike@axios.com) — just hit "reply" and we're connected. I try to answer every email promptly and personally. If I miss one, it was a lapse and I apologize — please hit me again.
  • Part of the secret sauce of Axios — including our mobile stream, our newsletters (6 daily and 5 weekly: all free), our Expert Voices posts, our videos, our events, our five flavors of breaking-news alerts — is that you take them personally, and want us to be our best. So I'm always grateful for your blunt critiques.
  • People thank us for Axios. I've been lucky to work in media for 30 years, going back to the then-afternoon paper in Fredericksburg, Va. Having people thank you is new. So thank you for this invigorating 10 months.
  • Enjoy a day of peace, send me your thoughts and pics (mike@axios.com), and I'll see you tomorrow morning after a day at my brother Scott's, down in Raleigh.
  • Scott will deep-fry a turkey or two; Morgan has already bagged a mallard; Sheri and her mom, Sandy, will fill every oven and burner; Evan will entertain us ... and Uncle Mike will gobble!

Please invite your friends, colleagues and relatives to join the Axios AM breakfast conversation free here.

2. "Everything is awesome!"

The Trump-pardoned turkeys — Drumstick (left) and Wishbone — yesterday joined other spared birds at Gobblers Rest on the Virginia Tech campus in Blacksburg, Va. (Matt Gentry / The Roanoke Times, via AP)

That headline is homage to Politico's great Michael Grunwald, who in 2014 reminded us: "America's looking much better than you think."

A "Democracy in America" dispatch by The Economist looks at the bright side of an otherwise bleak Pew Research Center study, and finds that "on some issues, and across party lines, agreement is growing":

  • "Only 3% of Democrats and 8% of Republicans believe that increasing number of people from different races, ethnic groups and nationalities in America makes the country a worse place to live."
  • "The proportion of Republican supporters who see immigrants as a burden on the country has fallen from 64% in 1994 to 44% today."
  • Another Pew report found that "86% of Republicans believe they are on the way to achieving the 'American Dream' or have achieved it, along with 80% of Democrats."
  • Pew: "Only about one-in-five (17%) say the American dream is 'out of reach' for their family."
  • According to Gallup, "the proportion of Americans who reported they were satisfied with the way their life was going reached 87%, up from 78% in 2011 and only one percentage point below the highest number reported since the poll question was first asked by Gallup in 1979."

Why it matters, from The Economist: " It seems that many dinner tables divided by party politics will still be united by the idea that there is much to give thanks for—even if everyone agrees that America has a lot to worry about."

  • A sign of our times: "The percentage of Republicans who think homosexuality should be accepted, at 54%, now matches the percentage of Democrats who favored tolerance in 1994," 23 years ago.

3. Holiday special: Polarized America

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser / Axios

The other side of the coin ... Donald Trump was a symptom, not the cause, of our cancerous politics — and the disease is metastasizing. Signs of the spread are everywhere: in politics, in media and in business.

  • For 70 years, our feelings about Russia were bipartisan. Now, the topic is a tripwire.

To get smart fast on how we got here, jump into a holiday-reading feature cooked up my Axios colleagues, a political polarization stream.

Bonus: Pic du jour

AP's J. David Ake

Traffic streaks across the Francis Scott Key Bridge linking D.C.'s Georgetown and Arlington, Va., yesterday at the start of the Thanksgiving holiday weekend.

4. Basting with the best: Tips from 5 top chefs

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio / Axios

Axios' Expert Voices Editor, Chris Russell, invites a few helping hands into your kitchen:

Share the conversation.

5. Surprise! Mom was right

D'oh! Don't eat the dough. This apricot almond coffee cake is made of cream biscuit dough, packed with dried apricots, layered with almond paste and glazed with apricot jam. (Sara Moulton via AP)

N.Y. Times Quote of the Day, from "Thanks a Lot! New Reasons Not to Eat Cookie Dough":

  • Samuel Crowe, an epidemiologist who led a new study concluding that eating doughs and batters — even those that do not contain eggs — can you make you seriously ill because of bacteria in the flour: "We're not trying to ruin people's holidays but we want them to be aware of the risks."

6. A Florida Thanksgiving

AP's Alex Brandon

In Axios PM (sign up free here), we showed you Trump's motorcade as it arrived at his golf club in West Palm Beach. Here's the motorcade, on the move from Mar-a-Lago.

  • Trump tweets: "HAPPY THANKSGIVING, your Country is starting to do really well. Jobs coming back, highest Stock Market EVER, Military getting really strong, we will build the WALL, V.A. taking care of our Vets, great Supreme Court Justice, RECORD CUT IN REGS, lowest unemployment in 17 years."

7. Both parties have Weinstein worries

AP's Mark Lennihan

Both parties have post-Weinstein worries. As we told you in Axios PM: Over the next month, we're likely to see careers "of multiple members of Congress thrown into peril over new sexual claims. Newsrooms are throwing serious resources into this story and victims feel liberated. This is the beginning, not the end, of a story that will upend the Capitol."

On the R side ... Amid the Roy Moore fracas, "Representative Joe Barton of Texas, [vice chair] of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, ... said that he was reconsidering his political future after [a naked picture of him] appeared on an anonymous Twitter account," per the N.Y. Times.

  • Barton may fight: He said in a statement "that he had suffered 'a potential crime.' A Texas law, the so-called revenge pornography law, makes it a misdemeanor to intentionally publicize images or videos of someone's genitals or sexual activity without consent."
  • His accuser already is: A WashPost front-pager, dragged on Twitter for missing the nuance about revenge porn, says Barton "told a woman to whom he had sent sexually explicit photos, videos and messages that he [might] report her to the Capitol Police because she could expose his behavior."

On the D side ... "[N]ow 'me too' stains the Democrats, too, putting them in an awkward place as they calibrate how forcefully to respond," AP's Juliet Linderman and Cal Woodward write:

  • "Allegations against Sen. Al Franken of Minnesota and Rep. John Conyers of Michigan ... have prompted a hard look back at the way Democrats and their allies once circled the wagons around President Bill Clinton."
  • "In a story published [yesterday] by the Huffington Post, two more women alleged that Franken touched their buttocks during campaign events in 2007 and 2008. ... Franken said in a statement, 'It's difficult to respond to anonymous accusers, and I don't remember those campaign events.'"
  • "BuzzFeed has published affidavits from former employees of Conyers who said they saw the Democrat inappropriately touching women who worked for him and asking them for sexual favors"

8. Uber hackers may have been Russian

"Thousands of Uber customers are believed to have had their accounts hacked by Russians after users of the app reported being billed in roubles for taxi journeys they had not taken in Moscow and St Petersburg," according to The Times of London.

  • "More than 800 people in Britain and the United States have complained on Twitter that their accounts were taken over in the past year, ... with the number of reports spiking in April and May."

P.S. Peter Thiel May Be Looking To Buy Gawker.com, BuzzFeed scoops: "Lawyers for the Silicon Valley billionaire filed a motion ... to challenge a provision that prevented him from buying the assets of the now defunct Gawker.com. That move lays the groundwork for a possible bid for the website and its archive."

9. Undersea peril

"A multinational search to find an Argentine submarine remains fruitless more than a week after it vanished," CNN reports:

  • "The ARA San Juan, which is carrying 44 crew members, including the country's first woman submarine officer, was last seen a week ago, on November 15, in the San Jorge Gulf, about 268 miles off the coast of Argentina."
  • "The submarine has only enough air to last seven to 10 days if it has remained fully immersed."

10. 1 fun thing: We still love catalogs

AP's Robert F. Bukaty

"When Internet sales began to take off, ... many predicted the death of the mail-order catalog. ... [T]hose predictions have proved to be premature."

  • That's from an AP "Enduring catalogs" story from Thanksgiving, 2004. (What were you doing then?)
  • Reminds me of an expression my colleague Dana Milbank had when we shared the White House beat for The Washington Post (come to think of it, in 2004): "There are no new stories. Just new reporters."

Well, it's back — on the front page of today's L.A. Times ... "Retailers taking another look at print catalogs: Nostalgia, tactile experience are answer to digital fatigue," by Ronald White:

  • Several Toys R Us holiday commercials feature the old-school mail-order catalog. In one, a mom sweats through her cycling workout while her daughter fans her, then says: "I'm just gonna leave this right here." She covers the stationary bike's display with a Toys R Us circular.
  • For the first time since 2011, Sears Holdings sent out the Sears Wish Book, a holiday tradition for generations of children. This year's catalog has the heft of a magazine rather than the phone-book size of Sears' heyday.

Featured

Axios PM

Situational awareness: The FAA reports few delays at the nation's airports on what is often the busiest travel day of the year. Sorry to folks traveling through Newark and New York's La Guardia. The full map.

1 big thing: Congress should be terrified of December

In the span of six days, three members of Congress have apologized for sexual misconduct and lewd behavior, providing ample reason for their peers to fear the weeks ahead.

The list:

  • Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) faces two accusations of unwanted groping, along with a Senate Ethics Committee probe.
  • In the House, Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich.) has been linked to multiple sexual harassment claims, one paid out by his congressional office.
  • Today, Rep. Joe Barton (R-Texas) apologized for a nude photo of himself that surfaced on Twitter. He does not face any accusations of wrongdoing.

Why it matters, per Axios' Jonathan Swan: We thought we'd be spending December talking about tax reform and an end of year spending deal. A much safer bet: the next month we'll be watching multiple careers of multiple members of Congress thrown into peril over new sexual claims. Newsrooms are throwing serious resources into this story and victims feel liberated. This is the beginning, not the end, of a story that will upend the Capitol.

Go deeper: Our card deck of men accused of sexual misconduct.

P.S. Alabama's special election is on December 12, and the communications director for Roy Moore resigned today. (Meet Moore's opponent.)

2. What you missed

The motorcade of President Donald Trump arrives at at the Trump International Golf Club, Wednesday, Nov. 22, 2017, in West Palm Beach, Fla. Photo: Alex Brandon / AP


  1. Facebook will tell users whether they followed pages set up by Russian operatives as part of a broad campaign to interfere in the 2016 election. Details.
  2. The former doctor for the U.S. gymnastics team pleaded guilty on Wednesday to the abuse of seven girls. Background.
  3. Today is the deadline to apply for the 2019 Diversity Immigrant Visa Program lottery. More.
  4. Some 1.8 million Chinese coal and steel workers will lose their jobs by the end of the year, victims of the government's shift to cleaner industries and a shutdown of small enterprises. Go deeper.
  5. Bankrupt retailer Toys "R" Us disclosed in court papers that it paid CEO David Brandon a $2.8 million retention bonus just before filing for Chapter 11 protection in September. The rest.

3. One wild video

Photo: United Nations Command via AP.

A video released by the United Nations shows the North Korean soldier who defected to the South on November 13th making his getaway in a green jeep, running towards the border separating Panmunjom, North Korea from the South, and then collapsing on the South Korean side.

Watch the video.

Featured

You have no privacy

Uber pick-up point at LaGuardia. Photo: Seth Wenig / AP

Uber's belated announcement of a "2016 Data Security Incident" — the hack of personal information about 57 million Uber users around the world — is the latest in a barrage of breaches that shows we can't count on any privacy, regardless of how personally cautious/paranoid we are.

The big picture: This is part of a creeping change in our society — not based on any one announcement or event. But these breaches, which the targeted corporations have repeatedly tried to conceal and understate, show that all of us have either had private data captured and resold underground, or will soon enough.

Back to Uber:

  • Uber's new CEO, Dara Khosrowshahi, admitted in a blog post that Uber failed "to notify affected individuals or regulators last year."
  • The CEO added: "We are changing the way we do business."
  • Bloomberg says Uber "paid hackers $100,000 to delete info, keep quiet."

USA Today compiled figures on other massive breaches. Consider the union of all these users — it's virtually everybody:

  • Yahoo: 1 billion (Dec. 2016) (Later updated to 3 billion in Oct. 2017)
  • Equifax: 143 million (Sept. 2017)
  • Target: 110 million (Nov. 2013)
  • LinkedIn: 100 million (May 2016)
  • Home Depot: 53 million, (Sept. 2014)
  • U.S. Office of Personnel Management: 21.5 million (July 2015)
Featured

Axios AM

Good Wednesday morning, and happy getaway day. An encouragement for a head start on resolutions, which flashed above Roy and me as we dogged the run at Orangetheory Fitness: "Yesterday you said today."

Bulletin ... "A United Nations war crimes tribunal convicted Ratko Mladic, the former Bosnian Serb general, ... of war crimes, genocide and crimes against humanity in the slaughter of Bosnian Muslims during the breakup of Yugoslavia." (N.Y. Times)

1 big thing: You have no privacy

Uber pick-up point at LaGuardia (AP's Seth Wenig)

Uber's belated announcement of a "2016 Data Security Incident" — the hack of personal information about 57 million Uber users around the world —is the latest in a barrage of breaches that shows we can't count on any privacy, regardless of how personally cautious/paranoid we are.

  • Uber's new CEO, Dara Khosrowshahi, admitted in a blog post that Uber failed "to notify affected individuals or regulators last year."
  • The CEO added: "We are changing the way we do business."
  • Bloomberg says Uber "paid hackers $100,000 to delete info, keep quiet."

USA Today compiled figures on other massive breaches. Consider the union of all these users — it's virtually everybody:

  • Yahoo: 1 billion (Dec. 2016)
  • Equifax: 143 million (Sept. 2017)
  • Target: 110 million (Nov. 2013)
  • LinkedIn: 100 million (May 2016)
  • Home Depot: 53 million, (Sept. 2014)
  • U.S. Office of Personnel Management: 21.5 million (July 2015)

Be smart: This is a creeping change in our society — not based on any one announcement or event. But these breaches, which the targeted corporations have repeatedly tried to conceal and understate, show that all of us have either had private data captured and resold underground, or will soon enough.

2. Behind the curtain

Wishbone, one of two turkeys pardoned by Trump yesterday, is previewed in the press briefing room. (AP's Jacquelyn Martin)

A source close to Trump tells Axios' Jonathan Swan what led to the president's statement yesterday boosting Roy Moore, delivered on the South Lawn as the first family headed to Mar-a-Lago for Thanksgiving:
  • "He basically said we can't lose an Alabama seat when we've got such a slim majority already. ... Said he doesn't know what's true and what's not, but some of the stuff is clearly political. You've got Gloria Allred somehow involved. You've got a guy who's been in the spotlight for decades and run for office a bunch of times, and this never comes out until four weeks before an election."

3. Repercussions from Charlie Rose

Happier days ... Norah O'Donnell, Charlie Rose and Gayle King on the set of "CBS This Morning" in January (CBS via AP)

There was no "if true." Reflecting quickly changing times, Charlie Rose's "CBS Morning News" co-hosts delivered unsparing denunciations of their former friend and colleague, hours before CBS announced his firing:

  • Norah O'Donnell: "This has to end. ... This is a moment that demands a frank and honest assessment about where we stand, and more generally the safety of women. Let me be very clear. There is no excuse for this alleged behavior. It is systematic and pervasive and I've been doing a lot of listening."
  • Gayle King: "I really am reeling. I got 1 hour and 42 minutes of sleep last night — both my son and my daughter called me. Oprah called me and said: 'Are you OK?' I am not OK. After reading that article in the [Washington] Post — it was deeply disturbing, troubling and painful for me to read."

P.S. "Rose's swift firing clouds CBS morning show's future," by L.A. Times' Stephen Battaglio, on A1: "CBS News President David Rhodes' decisive — and rapid — action reflects heightened responsiveness from companies as more women come forward with allegations against prominent media and entertainment industry figures in the wake of the Harvey Weinstein scandal."


Bonus: Pic du jour

Michael Kappeler/dpa via AP

German Chancellor Angela Merkel — who this week was unable to assemble the coalition needed to form a government, and now is contemplating a snap election — attends a plenary session of the German parliament Bundestag in Berlin yesterday.

4. Trump's "virtual wall"

Contractors' border-wall prototypes, on view in San Diego (AP's Elliott Spagat)

"President Trump's vision of a 'big, beautiful' wall along the Mexican border may never be realized. ... But in a systematic and less visible way, his administration is following a blueprint to reduce the number of foreigners living in the United States," the WashPost's Maria Sacchetti and Nick Miroff point out on A1:

  • "[F]ederal officials are wielding executive authority to assemble a bureaucratic wall that could be more effective than any concrete and metal one."
  • "The administration has moved to slash the number of refugees, accelerate deportations and terminate the provisional residency of more than a million people."
  • Why it matters: The moves could change the U.S. immigration system "for generations to come."
  • "Trump administration officials say they are simply upholding laws their predecessors did not and preserving American jobs."

5. New dereg move: Win for cable, wireless

The FCC's plan to roll back Obama-era net neutrality rules will allow internet providers to block or throttle content or offer paid fast lanes as long as they tell their customers, Axios' David McCabe reports:

  • The FCC's argument is that broadband providers are spending less on their networks because of the rules, something that is disputed by supporters of the rules.
  • FCC officials say lifting the blanket ban on "fast lanes" will be good for consumers but also for web services that would have to pay for preferential access.
  • Why it matters: The decision to lift the rules will open the door to internet providers charging customers more when they want to access a website, or giving them discounts to access content the provider produced.

6. U.S. shuns global trade, opens door to China

Data: The World Bank; Chart: Chris Canipe / Axios

Axios' Chris Canipe and Steve LeVine visualize trade as a proxy for geopolitical influence in Asia — what happens with President Trump's withdrawal from the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Explore, share the graphic.

7. Where we are: "Good-ish" growth forecasts

Leo Abruzzese, global director of public policy for The Economist Intelligence Unit, promising "Good-ish times for the global economy," in the magazine's "The World in 2018" special:

  • "Global output in 2017 grew at the fastest pace since 2010, but the year was hardly buoyant. Global growth (at market exchange rates) chugged along at 2.9%, below the 3% that was once considered just average."
  • "Growth in 2018 will be a bit slower, at 2.7%, but that hides a more encouraging reality: all of the big economies, developed and emerging, will be moving ahead."
  • "America and the European Union will both grow by a respectable 2% or so, Brazil and Russia are out of their latest recessions, once-tigerish Asian economies such as Indonesia and Malaysia will muster a peppy 5%, and India will race along at nearly 8%."
  • "Only debt-ridden China looks genuinely worrying, but the masters of the Middle Kingdom will still stoke enough demand to push growth to nearly 6%."

See more from The Economist's "The World in 2018."

8. Mugabe successor returns from exile

Zimbabweans celebrate outside the parliament building in downtown Harare, after hearing Mugabe had resigned. (AP's Ben Curtis)

"Zimbabwe's former vice-president, whose sacking led to the shock resignation of long-time leader Robert Mugabe, will be sworn in as the new president on Friday," BBC reports:
  • Emmerson Mnangagwa, who fled to South Africa two weeks ago, will fly home today.
  • The end of Mugabe's 37-year rule sparked wild celebrations across the country late into the night.
  • "The announcement that the 93-year-old was stepping down came in the form of a letter read out in parliament, ... abruptly halting impeachment proceedings against him."
  • "Mugabe said he was resigning to allow a smooth and peaceful transfer of power, and that his decision was voluntary." Ha!
N.Y. Times Quote of the Day ... David Mushakwe, a car electrician in Harare: "I just want to say to His Excellency: 'Go and rest now, our father. We still love you. But we're happy today. We're hoping now for a better future.'"

9. Coming attractions

AP's Manuel Balce Ceneta

First lady Melania Trump and Barron Trump, 11, greet a 19½-foot Balsam fir from Wisconsin at the North Portico on Monday. AP's Darlene Superville says the tree will be displayed in the Blue Room:

  • "The White House grounds superintendent and the chief usher, who oversees the residence, picked out the tree during a September scouting trip."
  • "The tree for the Blue Room usually arrives the day after Thanksgiving, but it was delivered early this year to accommodate the Trumps, who [left yesterday for] their Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida."
  • "While the Trumps are away, a small army of volunteer decorators and florists from around the country will descend on the White House on Friday and spend the holiday weekend transforming the 132-room mansion for Christmas, complete with a tree in every public room."

10. 1 historic thing: 54 years ago today

Associated Press "A" wire copy edited for the teletypesetter circuit (AP)

AP Was There ... Nov. 22, 1963: "The Associated Press is republishing a version of its report ... It is published as it was originally, and contains an error in the first paragraph, which refers to Kennedy as the 36th president, instead of the 35th.
___
DALLAS, TX., NOV. 22 (AP) - President John F. Kennedy, thirty-sixth president of the United States, was shot to death today by a hidden assassin armed with a high-powered rifle.
  • Kennedy, 46, lived about an hour after a sniper cut him down as his limousine left downtown Dallas.
  • Automatically, the mantle of the presidency fell to Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson, a native Texan who had been riding two cars behind the chief executive.
  • There was no immediate word on when Johnson would take the oath of office. ...
  • The new president, Lyndon Johnson, and his wife left the hospital ... Newsmen had no opportunity to question them. ... One witness, television reporter Mal Couch, said he saw a gun emerge from an upper story of a warehouse commanding an unobstructed view of the presidential car.
  • Kennedy was the first president to be assassinated since William McKinley was shot in 1901. It was the first death of a president in office since Franklin D. Roosevelt succumbed to cerebral hemorrhage at Warm Springs, Georgia, in April 1945.

The motorcade sped on.

Bonus

AP

Featured

Axios PM

1. Another day of reckoning

President Trump has broken with his party leadership and his own daughter, telling reporters that Roy Moore "totally denies" the multiple sexual harassment and assault allegations against him and "you have to listen to him also."

Axios' Jonathan Swan emails with crucial context: "The RNC and NRSC have pulled all support for Moore. Multiple senior Republicans, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, have said they believe Moore's female accusers... Ivanka Trump told the AP: 'There's a special place in hell for people who prey on children. I've yet to see a valid explanation and I have no reason to doubt the victims' accounts.'"

More from Trump:

  • "We don't need a liberal Democrat in that seat... we don't need somebody soft on crime like [former prosecutor Doug] Jones."

  • "Women are very special. I think it's a very special time, a lot of things are coming out and I think that's good for our society and I think it's very very good for women and I'm very happy" these things are coming out.
  • Reminder: Trump faced multiple harassment and assault allegations of his own during the presidential campaign.

But Trump was only part of another historic day. The quick hits:

  • CBS fired broadcaster Charlie Rose after a Washington Post article detailed multiple claims of harassment, including several on the record. PBS ended their relationship, and Bloomberg terminated their retransmission of his show.
  • Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich.) initially denied the BuzzFeed report that his office settled with a former worker after he allegedly fired her for turning down sex. He since admitted the settlement, but continues to deny the harassment allegations. He now faces a House Ethics Committee probe.
  • The New Yorker's latest by Ronan Farrow exposed how Harvey Weinstein allegedly used non-disclosure agreements, opposition research and favorable ties with the New York district attorney to evade prosecution.

2. What you missed

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, left, reacts after her son Huck, 4, climbed up the podium in the White House briefing room during a preview to the media of a turkey that is set to be pardoned by President Donald Trump, Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017, at the White House in Washington. Photo: Jacquelyn Martin / AP

  1. Inside the FCC's plan to end net neutrality. Details.
  2. Trump and Putin's phone call: The two spoke for an hour today. Topics included Syria, Ukraine, North Korea and terrorism.
  3. Latest from Niger: The Pentagon confirmed in a statement on Tuesday that additional remains of Sgt. La David T. Johnson were found at the site of the attack in Niger that killed four U.S. service members. More.
  4. Mugabe is officially gone: The African strongman has finally resigned after a coup. That's it.
  5. About those iPhones: Students have been working illegal overtime hours to assemble the iPhoneX at Apple's main supplier in Asia. Extra info.

1 fun thing

President Trump pardons Drumstick at the National Thanksgiving Turkey pardoning ceremony in the White House Rose Garden. Photo: Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP

The annual presidential turkey pardon happened today, and Drumstick picked up the crucial pardon.

Trump's joke: "As many as of you know, I have been very active in overturning many actions of my predecessor, but I have been informed by the White House Counsel's Office that Tater and Tot's pardons [made by former President Barack Obama] cannot under any circumstances be revoked. Tater and Tot, you can rest easy."

Video.

Featured

The great reckoning: media and politics rocked by sex scandals

Three of the latest public figures to be accused of sexual harassment: Glenn Thrush, Charlie Rose and Sen. Al Franken (from left to right). Photos: Mark Wilson / Getty Images, Carolyn Kaster / AP, Kaster / AP

In 12 short hours, elites lost their star anchorman, the New York Times benched a star Trump reporter, and Congress moved one step closer to losing a star Democratic senator — and possibly inheriting a Republican senator who may be booted. Plus the longest-serving Democratic congressman used money to hide harassment charges. All from sexual impulses and actions, uncontrolled and unwanted.

Spoiler alert: Many more allegations are coming.

The morning began with a second accuser of Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.), who had already been resisting calls to resign from "deeply disappointed supporters" and prominent party members back home.

  • At 10:30 a.m., during a weekly news meeting of the N.Y. Times Washington bureau, Vox published its long-rumored article on Glenn Thrush, who was suspended and says he "will soon begin outpatient treatment for alcoholism." His paper reported: "The meeting came to a halt as everyone stopped to read the article."
  • Then, the bookend ... At 4:45 p.m., a Washington Post news alert: "Eight women say longtime TV host Charlie Rose sexually harassed them — with nudity, groping and lewd calls." Rose has a uniquely broad empire, but instantly lost control: PBS and Bloomberg suspended distribution of his shows, and CBS suspended him as morning co-anchor. His 6 p.m. airing on Bloomberg TV was replaced by "Daybreak Asia."
  • A Roy Moore accuser went on air with the "Today" show — but Moore keeps tacit backing from the White House, which says the voters of Alabama should decide his fate.
  • And last night, BuzzFeed posted: "Michigan Rep. John Conyers, a Democrat and the longest-serving member of the House of Representatives, settled a wrongful dismissal complaint in 2015 with a former employee who alleged she was fired because she would not 'succumb to [his] sexual advances.'"

Why it matters: The speed and sweep of this are unmatched in social history.

What we're hearing: The tech world's dark secrets have been seeping out for months, and it's just under seven weeks since the N.Y. Times detonated its Harvey Weinstein exposé. So this may feel like a crest, but here's the amazing thing: Every sign is that for the East Coast, there's lots more to come.

  • News organizations are looking into specific congressmen, some with years-old reputations for leering, infidelity and more.
  • Reporters have been asking around about other well-known media figures. We hear one top name is the target of two media investigations.
  • And consider this: The wave has yet to hit the New York corporate suites. I'm told they're hardly immune.

P.S. The excuses ... "Franken and Trump, Hiding Behind Their 'Jokes,'" by N.Y. Times TV critic James Poniewozik: "[B]oth are examples of the collision of politics with the world of celebrity, where men have long felt entitled to indulge their ids, to play the grabby adolescent and then to laugh it off."

"The entertainment defense is attractive because of the leeway our society has given performers. A politician's gaffe is a comic's laugh."

Featured

Axios AM

Good Tuesday morning. Situational awareness ... "Sexual harassment cases flood state legislatures," per USA Today lead story: "Since last year, at least 40 lawmakers – nearly all men – in 20 states have been publicly accused by more than 100 people of some form of sexual misconduct or harassment."

1 big thing: The Great Reckoning

In 12 short hours, elites lost their star anchorman, the New York Times benched a star Trump reporter, and Congress moved one step closer to losing a star Democratic senator — and possibly inheriting a Republican senator who may be booted. Plus the longest-serving Democratic congressman used money to hide harassment charges.
  • All from sexual impulses and actions, uncontrolled and unwanted.
  • Spoiler alert: Many more allegations are coming.

The morning began with a second accuser of Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.), who had already been resisting calls to resign from "deeply disappointed supporters" and prominent party members back home.

  • At 10:30 a.m., during a weekly news meeting of the N.Y. Times Washington bureau, Vox published its long-rumored article on Glenn Thrush, who was suspended and says he "will soon begin outpatient treatment for alcoholism." His paper reported: "The meeting came to a halt as everyone stopped to read the article."
  • Then, the bookend ... At 4:45 p.m., a Washington Post news alert: "Eight women say longtime TV host Charlie Rose sexually harassed them — with nudity, groping and lewd calls." Rose has a uniquely broad empire, but instantly lost control: PBS and Bloomberg suspended distribution of his shows, and CBS suspended him as morning co-anchor. His 6 p.m. airing on Bloomberg TV was replaced by "Daybreak Asia."
  • A Roy Moore accuser went on air with the "Today" show — but Moore keeps tacit backing from the White House, which says the voters of Alabama should decide his fate.
  • And last night, BuzzFeed posted: "Michigan Rep. John Conyers, a Democrat and the longest-serving member of the House of Representatives, settled a wrongful dismissal complaint in 2015 with a former employee who alleged she was fired because she would not 'succumb to [his] sexual advances.'"

Why it matters: The speed and sweep of this are unmatched in social history.

What we're hearing: The tech world's dark secrets have been seeping out for months, and it's just under seven weeks since the N.Y. Times detonated its Harvey Weinstein exposé. So this may feel like a crest, but here's the amazing thing: Every sign is that for the East Coast, there's lots more to come.

  • News organizations are looking into specific congressmen, some with years-old reputations for leering, infidelity and more.
  • Reporters have been asking around about other well-known media figures. We hear one top name is the target of two media investigations.
  • And consider this: The wave has yet to hit the New York corporate suites. I'm told they're hardly immune.

P.S. The excuses ... "Franken and Trump, Hiding Behind Their 'Jokes,'" by N.Y. Times TV critic James Poniewozik: "[B]oth are examples of the collision of politics with the world of celebrity, where men have long felt entitled to indulge their ids, to play the grabby adolescent and then to laugh it off."

  • "The entertainment defense is attractive because of the leeway our society has given performers. A politician's gaffe is a comic's laugh."

2. "Vast uncertainty": ripples from AT&T

The Justice Department's suit to block AT&T's proposed $85 billion bid for Time Warner puts on hold a slew of media and telecom transactions that may have been in the works, Axios tech editor Kim Hart writes:

  • It could upend the antitrust precedent that has created some of today's biggest media companies.
  • Why it matters: The lawsuit is not only a blow to AT&T, but also to other companies hoping that similarly structured deals that combine content producers and distributors have a shot with the current administration.
  • It could also bring new scrutiny to the size and power of Google and Facebook, which have become media powerhouses in their own right.
  • The lawsuit is also a surprise. Despite President Trump's campaign-trail criticism of the deal, it was widely expected to win government approval from a Republican Justice Department. Rumblings that regulators had serious concerns about the deal only surfaced in the past couple of weeks.
  • Mark Cuban, who testified in favor of the deal at a congressional hearing last year, tweeted that Facebook and Google will be the big losers of DoJ's suit to block the deal. "Their media advertising, content and distribution dominance will be a defense at trial. That could create bigger issues for them."

3. "Techlash" to lead new progressive era?


Courtesy The Economist

The editor of The Economist, Zanny Minton Beddoes, says in the magazine's prediction issue that three forces will help swing "the pendulum of power" back towards the state and away from markets:

  1. "Across the rich world, politicians will turn on the technology giants — Facebook, Google and Amazon in particular — saddling them with fines, regulation and a tougher interpretation of competition rules. It will be the 21st-century equivalent of the antitrust era, with the tech giants vilified as malevolent quasi-monopolists whose behavior is weakening democracy, suppres­sing competition and destroying jobs. ... The pace will be set by the European Union ... But it is in America that the techlash will seem most dramatic."
  2. "The second force of change will be [French President Emmanuel ] Macron, who, notwithstanding his incrementalist start, will emerge as a modern-day equivalent of Teddy Roosevelt, the American president most associated with the Progressive Era. ... [B]oth wrap a reform agenda in the rhetoric of national renewal and greatness. Like Roosevelt, Mr. Macron is pushing a new kind of social contract, one that boosts competition and entrepreneurship while protecting workers who lose out."
  3. "The third force will be changing attitudes to China, the rising power of the 21st century. Much as the fear of a rising Germany shaped European policymaking in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, so worries about China's growing clout, and its intentions, form the backdrop today."

Her conclusion: "At worst, [this decisive shift in the West's balance between the state and the market] will be a back route to a more regulated, defensive and pro­tectionist kind of capitalism. But with luck, the new balance will be marked by a broader embrace of competition as the best way to counter the power of entrenched elites, and involve an imag­inative rethinking of the state's role in protecting the individual."

  • "That would make it a progressive era to be proud of."

4. Facebook's whistleblower wave

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio / Axios

Facebook insiders with detailed knowledge of the company's operations are increasingly voicing concerns that the tech giant is putting profits ahead of its users' best interests, Axios' Sara Fischer reports:

  • Their accounts come as many Silicon Valley insiders are speaking out about the negative consequences of the world they helped create.
  • Why it matters: The accounts put more pressure on the company to quickly and publicly address tough philosophical questions that they may not have the answers to yet. And it gives more ammunition for other Facebook alumni to come forward with their perspectives while they work their issues out.
  • Facebook responds with a blog post by Justin Osofsky, V.P. of Global Operations, "Enforcing Our Policies and Protecting People's Data."
  • "Like" this.

Bonus: New life for long-delayed Keystone XL

5. Continent rattled by Merkel fail

The Reichstag, the building of German parliament Bundestag, is reflected in a Berlin puddle yesterday. (AP's Markus Schreiber)

"German Chancellor Angela Merkel has said she would prefer new elections to leading a minority government, after a breakdown in coalition talks plunged the country into political crisis," BBC reports:

  • "She also said she did not see any reason to resign from her post despite the failed negotiations."
  • "Merkel faces her biggest challenge in 12 years as chancellor."
  • Why it matters: "[A]nalysts say the new elections would be likely to benefit the anti-Islam, anti-immigrant AfD [the nationalist Alternative for Germany, which entered parliament for the first time], so other parties would probably try to avoid them."

6. 1 fun thing

"Yankees Are Crowdsourcing Their Manager Vetting Process: Most sports teams try to conduct coach or manager searches privately. The Yankees are parading their candidates in front of the news media, one by one," the N.Y. Times' Yankees beat writer, Billy Witz, writes:

  • "In professional sports, the search for a new coach or manager is typically done in the shadows, to protect a team's competitive advantage as well as the candidates' privacy. Private jets may be dispatched."
  • "So far, each of the five people the Yankees have interviewed [to replace fired manager Joe Girardi] ... has been placed on a conference call with the news organizations that regularly cover the team."
  • "General Manager Brian Cashman said there were two purposes for the highly unusual decision to publicize the list of candidates."
  • "First, the news media may dig up information on a candidate that the Yankees' own background search has not."
  • "The other benefit is to observe how the candidates might handle questions from the news media — a significant and often stressful part of a Yankees manager's duties. The manager is required to do it twice a day, 162 times a year in front of what is typically the largest media contingent in baseball."
  • Step up to the plate.

Featured

Axios PM

1 big thing: The big Trump antitrust fight is here

"The U.S. Department of Justice is suing to prevent AT&T from completing its proposed $85 billion takeover of Time Warner, throwing the telecom giant's bet on becoming a media powerhouse in jeopardy," Axios' David McCabe reports.

  • Justice Department official to reporters: "Our investigation showed this is an illegal merger that would harm consumers."
  • Why it matters: "Antitrust regulators do not usually oppose so-called 'vertical' mergers like this one, in which one company is buying another against which it doesn't really complete. But it is unclear if the change is philosophical, or related to President Trump's campaign statements against the deal and his subsequent criticism of Time Warner property CNN."

Go deeper: AT&T's statement, and the DOJ's explanation for their case.

Stay tuned: We'll be covering a 5:30pm EST press conference from Time Warner and AT&T.

2. What you missed

The Georgia Dome is imploded Monday, Nov. 20, 2017, in Atlanta. The Dome was the home of the Atlanta Falcons, hosted two Super Bowls and the 1996 Summer Olympic Games. Photo: John Bazemore / AP


  1. Trump will designate North Korea a state sponsor of terror. Details... Tillerson's comments
  2. Angela Merkel in trouble: The German chancellor says she'd prefer a new election to leading a minority government. The latest.
  3. White House on Roy Moore: Kellyanne Conway said we "want the votes in the Senate to get this tax bill through" ... Sarah Sanders told reporters today that Trump wants people who support his agenda.
  4. Today's sexual harassment allegations:
    1. Lindsay Menz says Sen. Al Franken grabbed her inappropriately in 2010.
    2. The NYT has suspended reporter Glenn Thrush for multiple accusations of sexual harassment.
    3. Broadcaster Charlie Rose faces eight new accusations of sexual harassment, three on the record.

3. One big chart

Data: Money.net; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon / Axios

Chinese Internet giant Tencent is the first $500 billion company in Asia.

Next up: China's Alibaba Group currently has a market cap north of $480 billion.