Mar 12, 2018

2018 has already had 3 deadly commercial passenger plane crashes

Rescue workers at the scene of the crash in Kathmandu. Photo: Prakash Mathema / AFP via Getty Images

US-Bangla Flight 211 crashed in Kathmandu, Nepal on Monday, killing at least 40 of the 71 people on board. It's the third commercial airplane crash on record in 2018, after zero people died in such crashes in 2017.

Why it matters: Last year was the safest year on record for commercial air travel. But at least 177 people have already died in plane crashes this year, and it's only March.

The crashes:

  • Feb. 11: A Saratov Airlines plane crashes in Russia, southeast of Moscow, killing all 65 passengers and six crew members on board.
  • Feb. 19: An Iran Aseman Airlines crashes 14.500 above sea level on Mount Dena. All 66 people on the plane are killed.
  • March 12: Search and rescue for the Nepal crash is still ongoing as eight passengers are missing in the wreckage.

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