Alex Brandon / AP

Game on! It's war — with more ammunition for both sides after today's mesmerizing testimony by fired FBI Director Jim Comey.

In a morning-long Capitol Hill appearance marked by a theatrical precision that had workers around the country glued to their screens, Comey was happy to twist the knife: "I take the president at his word, that I was fired because of the Russia investigation."

Unspooling startling detail, Comey bluntly described how he engineered a dramatic leak to The New York Times, and ascribed his damaging in-the-moment memos to his "gut feel" that he needed to "protect" the FBI.

Trump's lawyer, litigator Marc Kasowitz, quickly responded with a combative statement accusing Comey of lying about Trump's demand for loyalty — "never said it in form, and he never said it in substance" — and of disclosing classified information in a way that "appears to be entirely retaliatory."

  • What's next: The back-to-back appearances set in motion months — perhaps years — of partisan back-and-forth that threatens to swamp Trump's legislative agenda.
  • To their corners: White House officials and top Hill Republicans say that based on the expectations that Comey was going to accuse the president of a felony, today's events left Trump in roughly the same place he was, with no one's minds changed. Democrats called the visual devastating, and claimed that Comey had made an under-oath case that Trump was trying to interfere with the investigation.
  • West Wing fears Mueller way more than Comey: They were fairly relaxed after this morning. This is a team that's acclimatized over many months to a highly abnormal working environment. Some staff have become so numb to negative news stories that they've taken to asking reporters how bad new stories are "on a scale of one to ten."
  • Be smart: The down side of today is more fog — and the fog spawns the ugliness that freezes Washington and infects the national debate.

Get up to speed: Highlights and quotes.

Go deeper: What we learned ... The questions Comey didn't answer

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Updated 8 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 20,755,406 — Total deaths: 752,225— Total recoveries: 12,917,934Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 5,246,760 — Total deaths: 167,052 — Total recoveries: 1,774,648 — Total tests: 64,831,306Map.
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  4. 2020: Biden calls for 3-month national mask mandateBiden and Harris to receive coronavirus briefings 4 times a week.
  5. States: Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp to drop lawsuit over Atlanta's mask mandate.
  6. Business: Why the CARES Act makes 2020 the best year for companies to lose money.
  7. Public health: Fauci's guidance on pre-vaccine coronavirus treatments Cases are falling, but don't get too comfortable.

Trump says he intends to give RNC speech on White House lawn

President Trump speaking to reporters on South Lawn in July. Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

President Trump told the New York Post on Thursday that he plans to deliver his Republican National Convention speech from the White House lawn, despite bipartisan criticism of the optics and legality of the location.

Why it matters: Previous presidents avoided blurring staged campaign-style events — like party conventions — with official business of governing on the White House premises, per Politico.

Fauci's guidance on pre-vaccine coronavirus treatments

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Antibody drugs and various medicine cocktails against the coronavirus are progressing and may provide some relief before vaccines.

The big picture: Everyone wants to know how and when they can return to "normal" life, as vaccines are not expected to be ready for most Americans for at least a year. Two therapies are known to be helpful, and more could be announced by late September, NIAID Director Anthony Fauci tells Axios.