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Photo: Ina Fried/Axios

Comcast said on Monday that while demand has increased significantly, so far its network can handle the traffic boost without a noticeable decline in speed or reliability.

Why it matters: There has been much concern over how well the internet would hold up as most of America is working and schooling from home. So far, broadband and wireless providers say they aren't seeing signs of trouble.

What they're saying: "The speeds are holding up well," Comcast's lead tech executive Tony Werner said on a conference call with journalists Monday. "There (are) not any trends that make me worry in the least."

  • Part of the reason is that Comcast tries to build capacity 12-18 months ahead of where it anticipates demand will be (and usage per customer tends to go up about 45% per year).

By the numbers:

  • Peak traffic is up 32% nationwide, but up as much as 60% in some areas, including Seattle and San Francisco. And while peak download times remain in the evening as people stream video, uploads are now busiest during the working day.
  • Video conferencing and voice-over-internet calling are up 212% since March 1.
  • Streaming and web video usage are up 38%.
  • Comcast's fledgling cellular business has seen a 10% decline in cellular data use and a 24% increase in mobile data carried over WiFi networks.

Go deeper: Schools get creative to keep students connected

Go deeper

The rebellion against Silicon Valley (the place)

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
2 hours ago - Economy & Business

Telework's tax mess

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

As teleworkers flit from city to city, they're creating a huge tax mess.

Why it matters: Our tax laws aren't built for telecommuting, and this new way of working could have dire implications for city and state budgets.

Wanted: New media bosses, everywhere

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Reuters, HuffPost and Wired are all looking for new editors. Soon, The New York Times will be too.

Why it matters: The new hires will reflect a new generation — one that's addicted to technology, demands accountability and expects diversity to be a priority.