USPS mail boxes in Longmont, Colorado. Photo: Matt Jonas/Digital First Media/Boulder Daily Camera via Getty Images

Jena Griswold, Colorado’s secretary of state, announced Saturday that her office filed a federal lawsuit against the United States Postal Service over pre-election mailers that contain "incorrect election information" for the state.

What they're saying: "The mailer incorrectly asks that voters request a mail ballot 15 days before the election and return their ballots by mail at least seven days before the election," Griswold said in a statement.

  • "In Colorado, every registered voter is sent a ballot without having to make a request and voters are urged to return ballots by mail sooner than seven days before the election. My office asked USPS officials to delay or not send the mailer in Colorado, but they refused to commit to that."
  • "The importance of this election, combined with the fact it is being held amidst a national pandemic, further heightens the need to provide correct voting information to Coloradans.”

The other side: David Rupert, a postal service spokesman, told the Denver Post that thousands of Colorado households have already received the mailer, with the rest set to get them next week.

  • He said the mailer is part of a national campaign to "educate the public on the Postal Service’s role in the mail-in ballot process."
  • “Some of it applies to everybody and some doesn’t," Rupert told the Post. "It’s meant for people to prepare.”
  • "The non-partisan campaign neither encourages nor discourages mail-in voting; rather, it is designed to reach and inform all voters about the importance of planning ahead if they plan to vote by mail."

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Updated 13 hours ago - Politics & Policy

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The state of play: The decision went under the radar alongside the simultaneous decision to extend the time that mail-in ballots could be counted, but Philadelphia's top elections official warned state legislators this week that throwing out so-called "naked ballots" could bring "electoral chaos" to the state and cause "tens of thousands of votes" to be thrown out — potentially tipping the presidential election.

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Why it matters: President Trump has ramped up his claims, without evidence, that widespread mail-in voting would rig the 2020 election against him. On Wednesday, after declining to say whether he would commit to a peaceful transition of power if he loses the election to Joe Biden, Trump said that "the ballots are out of control."

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Why it matters: The new data shows just how strongly the mail-in vote is likely to favor Joe Biden — with potentially enormous implications in the swing states due to the greater risk of rejection with mail ballots.