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Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

With television revenue rolling in, Power 5 schools are engaged in a new kind of arms race, paying significantly more money than ever before to coaches in so-called non-revenue sports.

Driving the news: USA Today examined how much money each Power 5 public school paid its head coaches in 23 sports other than football and men's and women's basketball in 2013 and 2018.

  • Their findings: In that five-year span, total compensation for those coaches grew a whopping 43%, which is almost the same rate of increase that football coaches saw (51%).
  • Specific examples: The average compensation in softball increased by 62%, with 11 schools paying more than $400,000. … The average compensation in baseball rose by 51% to $651,445 … and the average compensation in wrestling grew by 55% to $266,000.

Why it matters: "[T]he fact that compensation for coaches in lower-profile, money-losing sports has been growing at a similar rate to football raises red flags for some athletics directors worried about budget crunches," per USA Today.

  • It also raises red flags for critics of the NCAA model, who look at skyrocketing salaries in non-revenue sports alongside student-athletes who haven't seen a dime and see a broken system in desperate need of repair.

The big picture: In 2005, D-I schools spent more on scholarships than on coaches and administrative pay. But since then, the latter two have pulled ahead.

  • 2005: $736 million on scholarships, $721 million on coaches pay, and $686 million on administrative pay.
  • 2018: $1.92 billion on coaches pay, $1.72 billion on administrative pay, and $1.7 billion on scholarships.

Go deeper: How NCAA conferences earn money from March Madness

Go deeper

Oct 15, 2020 - Sports

NCAA close to approving name, image and likeness compensation proposal for student athletes

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The NCAA is one step closer to allowing student athletes to earn compensation for their name, image and likeness, with a new proposal expected to be approved in January.

Details: Once approved, the bylaw would be implemented ahead of the 2021-22 school year.

Updated 14 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Trump grants flurry of last-minute pardons

Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty

President Trump issued 73 pardons and commuted the sentences of 70 individuals early Wednesday, 11 hours from leaving office.

Why it matters: It's a last-minute gift to some of the president's loyalists and an evident use of executive power with only hours left of his presidency. Axios reported in December that Trump planned to grant pardons to "every person who ever talked to me."

59 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Trump revokes ethics order barring former aides from lobbying

Photo: Spencer Platt via Getty

Shortly after pardoning members of Congress and lobbyists convicted on corruption charges, President Trump revoked an executive order barring former officials from lobbying for five years after leaving his administration.

Why it matters: The order, which was signed eight days after he took office, was an attempt to fulfill his campaign promise to "drain the swamp."

  • But with less than 12 hours left in office, Trump has now removed those limitations on his own aides.