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Jacquelyn Martin / AP

Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats told the Senate Armed Services Committee this morning that he doesn't "feel it's appropriate to characterize [his] discussions with the president" after being asked about yesterday's reports that President Trump had asked him to publicly refute the possibility of the Trump campaign's collusion with Russia.

What he did say: Coats stated that he "made clear" to the White House that any "political shaping" of his position would be inappropriate. Additionally, he stated that he was unaware of the Trump administration reaching out to any other intel officials.

Another thing: Coats told the committee that he's been traveling and hasn't had a chance to discuss Trump's apparent disclosure of Israeli intel to Russian officials directly with the president yet.

The real purpose of the hearing was for Coats to provide an update on worldwide threats to the United States.

  • Manchester: "ISIS has claimed responsibility for the attack in Manchester…we have not verified, yet, the connection." Coats also referred to yesterday's bombing as a "suicide attack."
  • North Korea: The nation is nuclear but has "demonstrated capabilities short of an ICBM at this point in time."
  • Iran: The nuclear deal has "extended" its development time for a nuclear bomb "from a few months to about a year."
  • Russia and the U.S.: It will be "more unpredictable in its approach to the United States" as it continues to attempt to undermine democratic institutions around the world.
  • Russia and the Middle East: It wants to use its presence in Syria and the worldwide fear of ISIS to expand its influence across the Middle East.

Go deeper

Updated 2 hours ago - Health

CDC: Vaccinated people in COVID hotspots should resume wearing masks

CDC director Rochelle Walensky and top infectious disease expert Anthony Fauci at a Senate HELP committee hearing. Photo: J. Scott Applewhite-Pool/Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued updated guidance on Tuesday recommending that vaccinated people wear masks in indoor, public settings if they are in parts of the U.S. with substantial to high transmission, among other circumstances.

Why it matters: The guidance, a reversal from recommendations made two months ago, comes as the Delta variant continues to drive up case rates across the country. Millions of people in the U.S. — either by choice or who are ineligible — remain unvaccinated and at risk of serious infection.

Olympics medal tracker

Data: International Olympic Committee; Chart: Connor Rothschild/Axios
Bryan Walsh, author of Future
3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

U.S. students fell 4 to 5 months behind during pandemic

An empty classroom in Pinole, Calif. Photo: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Elementary school students in the U.S. ended the school year four to five months behind their expected level of academic achievement, according to a new report.

Why it matters: Months of school closures and often inferior remote education eroded what schoolchildren would have learned since the pandemic began, and caused some to go backwards.