Evan Agostini / AP

The May issue of GQ has a four-page spread on CNN's Jake Tapper as "The Hardest-Working Brow in the Business," by Taffy Brodesser-Akner:

[T]he Jake Tapper WTF Face [is] that unique look through which he transmits his seeming disbelief and outrage... There is the JTWTFF that is a mere frown ... a hood over his downward-turning, disappointed eyes... My favorite Jake Tapper WTF Face is the one where his eyebrows arch but also corrugate into small bowl-shaped caterpillars...
Tapper allows an incredulousness, and maybe even a smidge of disgust, to sneak on through. In those moments, when he augments the standard newsman persona to include his own come-off-it realness, he has a way of embodying all of us.

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Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

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  6. Media: Fox News president and several hosts advised to quarantine.
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