CNN's Omar Jimenez and his crew were released after being arrested Friday by Minneapolis state police while reporting on the protests that followed the death of George Floyd, a black man who died in police custody in the city.

What happened: CNN anchors said Jimenez and his crew were arrested for not moving after being told to by police, though the live footage prior to their arrests clearly shows Jimenez talking calmly with police and offering to move wherever necessary.

  • CNN producer Bill Kirkos and photojournalist Leonel Mendez were arrested alongside Jimenez.
  • Jimenez could be heard telling law enforcement before his arrest, "We can move back to where you like. ... We are getting of your way. Just let us know, wherever you'd want us let us know. We were getting out of your way when you were advancing the intersection."
  • Jimenez said that the officers were "pretty cordial" after his arrest, showed "no animosity" and weren't violent. He said he was told by the officer who led him away, "Look, I don't know, man. I'm just following orders."

Watch Jimenez live on air after his release, discussing the arrest:

The state of play: CNN reporter Josh Campbell was also reporting live in the area and noted he had also been approached by the police.

  • "I mean, it's unbelievable what's happening here. I was approached by the police here near the police station. One came up to me and asked who I was. I identified myself as a journalist. They asked what station. I told them CNN. They said, 'Okay, you're good.' They're pushing everyone else. A much different situation than what occurred with Omar Jimenez."
  • CNN anchor Alisyn Camerota noted, "It's just impossible not to note the difference. You are a white guy. Omar Jimenez identifies as black and Latino. Since the police didn't give us much of an explanation for what they were doing against the backdrop of these fires burning and George Floyd's death, it's impossible not to note the difference here."

What they're saying: CNN President Jeff Zucker spoke with Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz, and CNN anchor John Berman said that Walz "deeply apologizes for what happened. He is going to have the team released. ... The governor accepts full responsibility."

  • The network called the arrests a "clear violation of their First Amendment rights" and called for the crew's immediate release.
  • CNN reporter Abby Phillip tweeted: "Watching my friend and colleague being surrounded by police and arrested while doing his job live on tv. ... I just can’t. @OmarJimenez conducted himself with incredible professionalism in a truly terrifying situation."
  • CNN legal analyst Elie Honig tweeted: "If and when these absurd charges are dropped against @OmarJimenez and his crew, we need to know who specifically authorized the arrests in the first place. Somebody gave a green light. Could be prosecutor, could be police supervisor. How high did this decision go? Name names."

The bottom line: "The one thing that gave me a little bit of comfort is that it happened on live TV. ... That speaks to the power of having something happen on camera because you can have people speak up for you without you saying anything. ... You don't have to doubt my story. It's not filtered in any sort of way," Jimenez said after his release.

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Secret Service says it "misdirected" press to leave White House grounds

Protesters and U.S. Park Police clash after demonstrators tried to pull down the statue of Andrew Jackson in Lafayette Square near the White House on Monday. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Secret Service told members of the media covering a protest in Lafayette Square to leave White House grounds on Monday evening, as demonstrators attempted to topple a statue of Andrew Jackson.

Why it matters: It's an "incredibly unusual" move, noted CNN's Kaitlan Collins live on air. Reporters are typically redirected to the White House briefing room during such incidents, per CNN. A Secret Service spokesperson said in a statement to Axios, "[I]n response to the increasingly violent demonstrations in Lafayette Park, four members of the media were misdirected by the Secret Service to leave the White House grounds. The members of the press were rerouted to exits on the south side of the complex for their own safety."

Updated Jun 19, 2020 - Axios Events

Watch: A conversation to commemorate Juneteenth

On Friday, June 19, Axios' markets reporter Dion Rabouin hosted a discussion on the history of Juneteenth and the current nationwide protests against police violence, featuring former Obama advisor Valerie Jarrett, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner, BET founder Robert Johnson and activist DeRay Mckesson.

Robert Johnson discussed the history of Juneteenth and his advocacy around reparations.

  • On reparations and race relations: "Reparations is a demand on the part of African-Americans that we be made whole for the wealth that was stolen from slaves over a 300 year period...My position is that white America should recognize the debt and black Americans should be proud to accept the atonement."
  • How slavery laid the foundation for racial income inequality: "It is no secret that the net income of a white family is $170,000 on average. The net income of a black family is $17,000. That 10-fold disparity can be traced directly back to the wealth transfer that started with slave labor."

Mayor Sylvester Turner focused on policy decisions around policing in Houston, and responded to calls for defunding the police.

  • On his decision to increase police funding: "We need policing. [People] are asking for good policing. They're asking for a policing system that's accountable. They're also going beyond that...They want to be investing in communities and neighborhoods that have been overlooked and under invested in for decades."

Valerie Jarrett discussed the ongoing demonstrations around the country and the upcoming election in November.

  • On the importance of civil rights during this political moment: "We need a robust civil rights division...in deciding how you want to vote, you should say, are the people who are in office actually worrying about the civil rights of all Americans and not just some Americans?"
  • On how to make cultural progress: "It's not good enough to just say, 'Look, I'm not a racist.' What you have to say is: 'What am I going to do to help change our culture, to make it better?' There's something that we can all do individually. There's certainly something the business community can do."

DeRay Mckesson highlighted how the present moment invites people to reimagine the concept of safety.

  • "The question is not police, no police. The question is like, how do I stay safe and what does safety look like? The police are not the best answer to that. The police aren't the only answer to that. And the police shouldn't be the answer that we fund when we think of that question."

Thank you Bank of America for sponsoring this event.

Louisville police officer involved in Breonna Taylor shooting fired

Protesters hold pictures of Breonna Taylor, left, Andrew Kearse, center, and Ahmaud Arbery, right, during a demonstration on June 22 in Boston, Massachusetts. Photo: Matthew J. Lee/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Louisville police officer Brett Hankison was fired on Tuesday, effective immediately, for "blindly" firing 10 bullets into Breonna Taylor's apartment on March 13, the police department announced.

Driving the news: Black Lives Matter protesters and activists on social media have called for punitive action in the wake of Taylor's death, after she was fatally shot by police who entered her apartment without warning through a "no-knock" warrant.