Josh Reynolds / AP

Hillary friends say she's seething with rage and haunted by losing to someone she considers a dumb, soulless manipulator ...

"She's okay. How about you?" ... HRC interview with New York mag, "Hillary Clinton Is Furious. And Resigned. And Funny. And Worried. The surreal post-election life," by Rebecca Traister:

"Almost everywhere Clinton goes, it seems, someone starts crying. ... At restaurants, in grocery stores, on planes, and in the woods, there are lines of people wanting selfies, hugs, comfort."

"I had people literally seeking absolution. ... 'I'm so sorry I didn't vote. I didn't think you needed me.' I don't know how we'll ever calculate how many people thought it was in the bag, because the percentages kept being thrown at people ... I never bought any of that, but lots of people did."

Clinton knows that had she won, she would have governed in a time of deep anti-feminist backlash: "You know what? ... I would have loved to have had that problem. Look, I know what's out there. I have lived it."

"Part of what my opponent did, which was brilliant ... was blow the top off: You can say whatever you want about anybody else, and I'll tell you who to be against. I'll tell you who you should be resentful of." The stories her campaign tried to tell, she says, "were boring in comparison to the energy behind malicious nostalgia."

Traister asked if she's ever been in therapy, and she shakes her head: "Unh-uh. No. I have not. ... Well, we had some marital counseling in the late '90s, around our very difficult time, but that's all. ... That's not how I roll. I'm all for it for anybody who's at all interested in it. It's just not how I deal with stuff."

Without saying his name, Hillary ('69) goes after Trump at Wellesley commencement: "When people in power invent their own facts and attack those who question them, it can mark the beginning of the end of a free society."

"You are graduating at a time when there is a full-fledged assault on truth and reason."

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