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Clinton and Sanders' campaign managers think GOP tax plan is good for Dems

Bernie Sanders' former campaign manager Jeff Weaver (left) and Hillary Clinton's former campaign manager Robby Mook. Photos: AP

Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders' former campaign managers, Robby Mook and Jeff Weaver, argue in a memo obtained by CNN that the GOP's effort to overhaul tax reform has given Democrats a "golden opportunity" to get ahead in "just about every demographic."

Why it matters: Senate Republicans are set to pass their tax bill later today, which would be a major legislative win for the GOP going into the 2018 midterm elections.

What they're saying: "It is quite a feat for Republicans to have designed a bill that could alienate Obama-Trump voters, Romney-Clinton voters and base Democrats all at the same time, but the tax plan achieves exactly this trifecta," they write. "...If Democrats properly seize this issue, they can potentially win over most every swath of the electorate critical to next year's midterm elections."

Mook and Weaver's argument:

  • The tax measure contradicts Trump's "anti-swamp" rhetoric: "The bill lavishes new tax cuts on the wealthiest Americans and corporations that voters already think do not pay their fair share" by protecting special interests, like the carried interest loophole.
  • It eliminates the state and local tax deduction (SALT), which will create tax hikes "on suburban households in states like New York, California, New Jersey and Pennsylvania – all places that could well determine control of the House in 2018."
  • It includes "a sneaky repeal" of the Affordable Cara Act's individual mandate, which would "cause premium hikes averaging 10%."
  • "The Republican tax plan is the rare piece of legislation that manages to provide something for nearly everyone to hate," they said.
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Where Trump's steel and aluminum trade war will hit first

Note: Includes only products under the "Iron & Steel & Ferroalloy" and "Alumina & Aluminum & Processing" NAICS commodity classifications. Data: Census Bureau; Chart: Chris Canipe and Lazaro Gamio / Axios

The Trump administration has begun imposing tariffs on imports of steel and aluminum, but several countries are exempted temporarily until May 1, as shown in the chart above. The administration may still apply quotas on exempted countries to prevent a flood of foreign steel and aluminum in the U.S. market, per the White House.

Why it matters: After railroading past a number of his advisors, Trump announced the tariffs on imports of steel (at 25%) and aluminum (at 10%) earlier this month, citing national security concerns. But with the exemption noted above, the tariffs won't carry major bite, at least to start.

Haley Britzky 2 hours ago
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Both Bush and Obama also requested line item veto power

Donald Trump.
Photo: Mark Wilson / Getty Images

President Trump tweeted on Friday evening that to avoid having "this omnibus situation from ever happening again," he wants Congress to re-instate "a line-item veto."

Why it matters: This would allow him to veto specific parts of a bill without getting rid of the entire thing. Trump was deeply unhappy with the $1.3 trillion spending bill approved by Congress early Friday morning, but signed it anyway on Friday afternoon.