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President Trump signed the act that established the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency in 2018. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty

A top committee made up of officials from the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) and its election partners refuted President Trump’s claims of widespread voter fraud and irregularities in a statement Thursday, calling the election "the most secure in American history."

The big picture: Trump has refused to concede to President-elect Joe Biden and is pursuing lawsuits in a number of states with baseless claims of voter fraud. The public statement from the president's own Department of Homeland Security undermines his narrative and is sure to infuriate him.

What they’re saying: “There is no evidence that any voting system deleted or lost votes, changed votes or was in any way compromised," members of the Election Infrastructure Government Coordinating Council (GCC) Executive Committee said in a statement.

  • Voting systems were made secure through pre-election testing, state certification of voting equipment and the U.S. Election Assistance Commission’s certification of equipment.
  • The joint statement acknowledged “opportunities for misinformation” and urged voters to seek out election officials as “trusted voices.”

Between the lines: This government statement about the election being secure should be unremarkable, Axios' Jonathan Swan notes.

  • But the sad reality is it’s a dangerous document for the officials who wrote it.
  • Every person who had a hand in writing it will almost certainly face the wrath of Trump and his inner circle in the White House.

Driving the news: CISA director Christopher Krebs has told associates he expects to be fired after he angered the White House by debunking election misinformation promoted by Trump online, Reuters first reported Thursday.

  • The White House also asked Bryan Ware, assistant director for cybersecurity at CISA, to hand in his resignation, which he did on Thursday, according to Reuters.

Go deeper

Updated Dec 1, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Barr says DOJ has not seen evidence of fraud that would change election results

Photo: Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Attorney General Bill Barr told AP on Tuesday that the Department of Justice has not uncovered evidence of widespread voter fraud that would change the outcome of the 2020 presidential election.

Why it matters: It's a direct repudiation of President Trump's baseless claims of a "rigged" election from one of the most loyal members of his Cabinet.

Georgia election official to Trump: Condemn “potential acts of violence”

Gabriel Sterling. Photo: Jessica McGowan via Getty

Gabriel Sterling, Georgia’s voting implementation manager, called on President Trump and the state's Republican senators to denounce threats against election workers in a press conference on Tuesday.

Why it matters: State election workers have been the recipients of death threats after conspiracy theorists shared false videos about the election results on social media. Trump and his allies continue to claim widespread election fraud took place in the state.

Setting the Biden-era cybersecurity agenda

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

The Biden administration will face a wide array of cybersecurity challenges but can take meaningful action in at least five key areas, concludes a new report by the Aspen Cybersecurity Group.

Why it matters: Cybersecurity policy is a rare refuge from Washington's hyperpartisan dysfunction, as shown by the recent work of the bipartisan Cyberspace Solarium Commission. President-elect Joe Biden should have a real opportunity to make progress on shoring up the nation's cybersecurity and cyber capabilities without bumping up against a likely Republican-controlled Senate.