Apr 27, 2017

Chromebook becomes unlikely competitor to Apple, Microsoft

Alice Keeler via Flickr CC

In 2013 Chromebooks became the fastest-growing segment of the PC market as it started expanding its sales in school districts. By fall of 2014 Chromebooks shot ahead of iPad shipments for educational purposes, and last year, Chromebooks outsold Mac OS devices in the market despite expectations for it to fail from the outset.

Why Chromebook's getting ahead: It's not just about price. One of the big appeals is each student can log into any Chromebook and as soon as they log out another student can use it. They are also easy to manage, have no software to install, and update automatically — schools typically have little to no IT support, so the full hardware solution Chromebooks offer is key.

Why it matters: Apple and Microsoft have taken note, and may be trying to catch up, per TechCrunch. The opportunity to expose first-time computer users in K-12 spaces to your product and turn them into lifelong users is too good to pass up.

  • Microsoft already supports tablets and laptops that compete on price with Chromebooks but has struggled on these other fronts. Windows 10 cloud, expected to be announced next week at a NY event, could help with that.
  • Apple has always had education at the center of its operations, and now some of its decision making appears to be influenced by Chromebook's rise to success. They're now offering Classroom alongside iOS 9.3, which brings a similar easy log-in system for multiple students and gives teachers an overview of accounts being used at one time. And Apple cut its prices to fall in line with Chromebooks, around $300 a pop.

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There are warning signs that Nevada could be Iowa all over again

Former Sen. Harry Reid (D) lines up to cast an early vote for the upcoming Nevada Democratic presidential caucus. Photo: Ethan Miller/Getty Images

The alarms are increasingly sounding over Nevada's Democratic caucus, which is just five days away.

Why it matters: Similar issues to the ones that plagued Iowa's caucus seem to be rearing their ugly heads, the WashPost reports.

China tries to contain coronavirus, as Apple warns of earnings impact

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's NHC; Note: China refers to mainland China and the Diamond Princess is the cruise ship offshore Yokohama, Japan. Map: Danielle Alberti/Axios

As China pushes to contain the spread of the novel coronavirus — placing around 780 million people under travel restrictions, per CNN — the economic repercussions continue to be felt globally as companies like Apple warn of the impact from the lack of manufacturing and consumer demand in China.

The big picture: COVID-19 has now killed at least 1,775 people and infected more than 70,000 others, mostly in mainland China. There are some signs that new cases are growing at a slower rate now, although the World Health Organization said Monday it's "too early to tell" if this will continue.

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Apple will miss quarterly earnings estimates due to coronavirus

Apple CEO Tim Cook

Apple issued a rare earnings warning on Monday, saying it would not meet quarterly revenue expectations due to the impact of the coronavirus, which will limit iPhone production and limit product demand in China.

Why it matters: Lots of companies rely on China for production, but unlike most U.S. tech companies, Apple also gets a significant chunk of its revenue from sales in China.