Jan 17, 2020

China's birth rate hits six-decade low

The square of Beijing railway station. Photo: Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images

China's birth rate is the lowest since 1961, with 14.6 million babies born in 2019, signaling struggles for families in a country with an underdeveloped social safety net, the National Bureau of Statistics said Friday, per AP.

The big picture: It's the country's third year in a row for falling birth rates, with factors like more financial freedom for women entering the workforce and Chinese couples' changing attitudes toward children with rising living costs, the New York Times reports.

By the numbers: China's also struggling with a rising population of 60 and older, with about 18% making up the total population.

  • In contrast, the working age population decreased by 890,000.
  • In total, the Chinese mainland reached 1.40005 billion people at the end of 2019, with an overall gain of 4.67 million people.

Go deeper: Demographics may decide the U.S-China rivalry

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Reducing immigration won’t stop America’s accelerating racial diversity

Reproduced from Census Bureau; Chart: Axios Visuals

Immigration is projected to drive most population growth in the United States by 2030, and cutting immigration levels will do little to alter the nation's coming racial and ethnic transformation, according to a new Census Bureau study on population projections.

Why it matters: A growing population will be essential to the U.S.'s long-term economic growth.

New Trump administration rule disallows use of visitor visas for "birth tourism"

Photo: Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images

A new Trump administration regulation that will make it harder for some pregnant women to receive tourist visas, first reported by Axios, is now in the Federal Register and will go into effect on Friday.

Why it matters: It is one of the first efforts by the Trump administration to chip away at the ability of foreigners to take advantage of birthright citizenship.

Go deeperArrowJan 23, 2020

China uses coronavirus to increase centralization

Excavators rush construction of a 1,000-bed field hospital in Wuhan, China. Photo: Getty Images

Chinese leader Xi Jinping, who has said little publicly about the growing coronavirus crisis, now has ordered mobilization across the country and drastic measures to hold back the contagion, the New York Times reports.

What he's saying: "Confronted with the grave situation of this accelerating spread of pneumonia from infections with the novel coronavirus, we must step up the centralized and united leadership under the party central” leadership.

Go deeperArrowJan 25, 2020