Charles Manson is escorted to his arraignment in the Sharon Tate murder case in 1969. Photo: AP

Charles Manson, leader of the cultish Manson Family and one of the most famous serial killers in American history, died yesterday at the age of 83, per The New York Times. Imprisoned since 1971 for the brutal murders of Sharon Tate — the wife of director Roman Polanski — and four others, he died of natural causes in a hospital.

Why it matters: Manson became one of the most inscrutable murderers in history — though he was never actually present when his family killed — and retained a hold on American popular culture through the years for his wild ideology. He never expressed guilt or remorse for his role in at least nine killings, which he had hoped would bring about an apocalyptic race war that he termed Helter Skelter.

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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

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Data: Bully Pulpit Interactive; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

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The big picture: Trump's Facebook ad messaging has fluctuated dramatically in conjunction with the news cycle throughout his campaign, while Biden's messaging has been much more consistent, focusing primarily on health care and the economy.

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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Joe Biden hasn't gone out of his way to talk about outer space during his presidential campaign. That could be bad news for NASA's exploration ambitions, but good news for the Space Force.

The big picture: NASA faces two threats with any new administration: policy whiplash and budget cuts. In a potential Biden administration, the space agency could get to stay the course on the policy front, while competing with other priorities on the spending side.