Oct 9, 2019

California will be first state to sell HIV-prevention drugs over the counter

A man shows Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP), an HIV preventative drug. Photo: Daniel Born/The Times/Gallo Images/Getty Images

California will be the first state to sell HIV-prevention drugs over the counter after Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a bill into law this week.

Why it matters: It's "a move that supporters say is an important step towards ending the AIDS epidemic," writes the New York Times.

  • There are nearly 40,000 new HIV infections across the country every year, and many people are at risk because they don't take the preventative drug PrEP.
  • PrEP is 99% effective in reducing the risk of getting HIV when taken daily, according to the CDC.
  • The law is set to go into effect in July.
“California will use our market power and our moral power to take on big drug companies and prevent them from keeping affordable generic drugs out of the hands of people who need them. Competition in the pharmaceutical industry helps lower prices for Californians who rely on life-saving treatments.”
— California Gov. Gavin Newsom in a press release

How it works: Pharmacists will receive special training in order to be able to administer 60-day supplies of PrEP, which is used in an emergency after exposure to the virus, per the Times.

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Updates: George Floyd protests continue past curfews

Police officers wearing riot gear push back demonstrators outside of the White House on Monday. Photo: Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images

Protests over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black people continued Tuesday across the U.S. for the eighth consecutive day — prompting a federal response from the National Guard, Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Customs and Border Protection.

The latest: Protesters were still out en masse even as curfews set in Washington, D.C., and New York City. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) slammed the New York Police Department late Tuesday following reports of police kettling in protesters on Manhattan Bridge.

Primary elections test impact of protests, coronavirus on voting

Election official at a polling place at McKinley Technology High School in Washington, D.C. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In the midst of a global pandemic and national protests over the death of George Floyd, eight states and the District of Columbia held primary elections on Tuesday.

Why it matters: Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic nominee, needs to win 425 of the 479 delegates up for grabs in order to officially clinch the nomination. There are a number of key down-ballot races throughout the country as well, including a primary in Iowa that could determine the fate of Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa).

Iowa Rep. Steve King defeated in GOP primary

Rep. Steve King. Photo: Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

State Sen. Randy Feenstra defeated incumbent Rep. Steve King in Tuesday's Republican primary for Iowa's 4th congressional district, according to the Cook Political Report.

Why it matters: King's history of racist remarks has made him one of the most controversial politicians in the country and a pariah within the Republican Party.