A man shows Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP), an HIV preventative drug. Photo: Daniel Born/The Times/Gallo Images/Getty Images

California will be the first state to sell HIV-prevention drugs over the counter after Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a bill into law this week.

Why it matters: It's "a move that supporters say is an important step towards ending the AIDS epidemic," writes the New York Times.

  • There are nearly 40,000 new HIV infections across the country every year, and many people are at risk because they don't take the preventative drug PrEP.
  • PrEP is 99% effective in reducing the risk of getting HIV when taken daily, according to the CDC.
  • The law is set to go into effect in July.
“California will use our market power and our moral power to take on big drug companies and prevent them from keeping affordable generic drugs out of the hands of people who need them. Competition in the pharmaceutical industry helps lower prices for Californians who rely on life-saving treatments.”
— California Gov. Gavin Newsom in a press release

How it works: Pharmacists will receive special training in order to be able to administer 60-day supplies of PrEP, which is used in an emergency after exposure to the virus, per the Times.

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Wolf Blitzer marks 15 years in "The Situation Room"

Wolf Blitzer on the White House beat in 1993, along with NBC's Brian Williams, CBS' Rita Braver and ABC's Brit Hume. Photo: Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images H

Aug. 8, 2005 — "The Situation Room's" debut on CNN wherein the host first said: "I'm Wolf Blitzer and you're in The Situation Room, where news and information from around the world arrive in one place simultaneously!"

The state of play: When the pandemic took off in the U.S. in March, Blitzer started working 7 days a week for 60+ days, until he took a Sunday off. Then he continued 7 days a week until he took a few days off.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10 a.m. ET: 19,412,292 — Total deaths: 722,066 — Total recoveries — 11,773,112Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10 a.m. ET: 4,945,795 — Total deaths: 161,456 — Total recoveries: 1,623,870 — Total tests: 60,415,558Map.
  3. Politics: Trump says he's prepared to sign executive orders on coronavirus aid.
  4. Public health: Fauci says chances are "not great" that COVID-19 vaccine will be 98% effective
  5. Science: Indoor air is the next coronavirus frontline.
  6. World: Africa records over 1 million coronavirus cases — Gates Foundation puts $150 million behind coronavirus vaccine production.
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Indoor air is the next coronavirus frontline

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

A growing body of research has made it clear that airborne transmission of the coronavirus is possible.

Why it matters: That fact means indoor spaces can become hot spots. Those spaces also happen to be where most business and schooling takes place, so any hope for a return to normality will require better ways of filtering indoor air.