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Pennsylvania voters voting in yesterday's primary election. Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

The results of last night's primary elections in Pennsylvania, Oregon, Idaho and Nebraska produced few serious surprises but did set up some potentially historic storylines ahead of this fall's general election.

The big picture: The second big primary night of the midterm election cycle was a good night for incumbents from coast-to-coast and a great night for women in Pennsylvania, where an altered congressional map could pave the way for big changes.

  • Zero House incumbents lost in their primaries, per Politico.
  • A potential first: Paulette Jordan won Idaho's Democratic primary for governor, setting her up to potentially become the nation's first Native American governor, per CNN.
  • Two GOP Senate candidates — Lou Barletta in Pennsylvania and Deb Fischer in Nebraska — with President Trump's support came out on top. They each scored congratulatory tweets this morning.
  • 41 seats: The number of statehouse seats that have flipped in favor of Democrats since President Trump took office. Helen Tai won the Philadelphia-area district that Trump won by 3 points in 2016.
  • For the fifth straight election cycle in Oregon's 4th congressional district, GOP candidate Art Robinson will face off against Democratic Rep. Peter DeFazio — now in his 16th term, per the Corvallis Gazette-Times.
  • Seven women in Pennsylvania will be moving on to the general election for House seats, as Axios' Alexi McCammond noted. No women currently occupy any of Pennsylvania's House seats or statewide elected offices.
  • 11 points: That's the margin of victory for Guy Reschenthaler in the GOP primary for Pennsylvania's 14th congressional district over Rick Saccone, who lost to Rep. Conor Lamb in a hotly-contested special election earlier this year.
  • $7.8 million: That's how much the National Republican Congressional Committee plans to spend in the Philadelphia market alone this fall ahead of Pennsylvania's general election, according to the NYT.

Go deeper

Obama: Broad slogans like "defund the police" lose people

Snapchat.

Former President Barack Obama told Peter Hamby on the Snapchat original political show "Good Luck America" that "snappy" slogans such as "defund the police" can alienate people, making the statements less effective than intended.

What he's saying: "You lost a big audience the minute you say it, which makes it a lot less likely that you're actually going to get the changes you want done," Obama told Hamby in an interview that will air Wednesday morning at 6 a.m. EST on Snapchat.

Nasdaq's ultimatum

Photo: Kelly Sullivan/Getty Images

New diversity and inclusion rules are on the table for some of America's most powerful corporations, courtesy of one of its most powerful stock exchanges.

What's new: Nasdaq is threatening to delist companies that won't move toward having at least one woman and at least one underrepresented minority or LGBTQ person on their corporate boards.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
2 hours ago - Economy & Business

The broken pipeline for Latino executives

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Latino professionals have the widest gap between representation in the labor force and executive positions — bigger than that of any other minority group.

Why it matters: Latinos will make up a quarter of the U.S. population by 2050, and scores of U.S. firms profit off of Latino consumers, but this group is absent from the business world's highest and most impactful decision-making positions.