Photo: Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images

BuzzFeed CEO Jonah Peretti unveiled an 8-step plan on Tuesday to save the internet from the "dumpster fire" that it has become. He's calling on the public, media, government and corporate America to pressure platforms into elevating quality journalism and weeding out bad content online.

Why it matters: Peretti made his name by making things go viral on the internet. Now, he says that society needs to "unbreak" the modern web that he helped pioneer, before internet trolls take it over.

The plan, according to Peretti:

  1. Get rid of the bad stuff (platforms): Better policy, algorithms, AI, more moderators.
  2. Support the good stuff (platforms): Share more revenue, make and buy content (Spotify podcasts).
  3. Diversify revenue (media companies): Native, commerce, studio, membership, subscriptions.
  4. Drive digital media collaboration (media companies): Merge or partner with competitors for leverage with platforms.
  5. Apply government pressure (the public): Vote for reps who fight for the internet you want, merge or partner with competitors for leverage with platforms.
  6. Apply advertiser pressure (brands): Pull your dollars from toxic content.
  7. Apply journalistic pressure (news orgs): Expose the hate and lies.
  8. Make viral hits everyone can rally around (media companies): Create hits that break through filter bubbles and unite the culture.

Go deeper

Pundits react to a chaotic debate: “What a dark event we just witnessed”

The first presidential debate between President Trump and Joe Biden in Cleveland on Tuesday night was a shouting match, punctuated by interruptions and hallmarked by name-calling.

Why it matters: If Trump aimed to make the debate as chaotic as possible with a torrent of disruptions, he succeeded. Pundits struggled to make sense of what they saw, and it's tough to imagine that the American people were able to either.

Trump to far-right Proud Boys: "Stand back and stand by"

Asked to condemn white supremacist violence at the first presidential debate on Tuesday, President Trump said the far-right Proud Boys group should "stand back and stand by," before immediately arguing that violence in the U.S. "is not a right-wing problem. This is a left-wing problem."

Why it matters: Trump has repeatedly been accused of failing to condemn white nationalism and right-wing violence, despite the FBI's assessment that it's the most significant domestic terrorism threat that the country faces. The president has frequently associated antifa and the left-wing violence that has afflicted some U.S. cities with Biden, despite his condemnation of violent protests.

Mike Allen, author of AM
2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

The first Trump v. Biden presidential debate was a hot mess

Photos: Jim Watson and Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

This debate was like the country: Everybody’s talking. Nobody’s listening. Nothing is learned. It’s a mess.

  • We were told President Trump would be savage. Turned out, that was a gross understatement. Even the moderator, Fox News' Chris Wallace, got bulldozed.

Why it matters: Honestly, who the hell knows?