Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images.

Mayor Pete Buttigieg's campaign said Monday that it will make future fundraisers open to the public, including reporters, and that the names of people raising money for the campaign will be released to the public.

Why it matters: Campaign finance is a hot-button issue among Democrats. Buttigieg has been hit especially hard on the issue from rival Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who attacked him last week for failing to disclose the names of his campaign’s top fundraisers since April. A press release from Buttigieg campaign manager Mike Schmuhl said the move is meant to show a "commitment to transparency."

What they're saying: "Our campaign strives to be the most transparent in the field," Schmuhl wrote.

  • Fundraising events will be open to the press beginning Tuesday, and a list of people raising money for Buttigieg will be available "within the week."
  • "From the start, Pete has said it is important for every candidate to be open and honest, and his actions have reflected that commitment," Schmuhl added.

The announcement added that Buttigieg has already released 12 years of his tax returns. He also pledged to restore White House press briefings if elected.

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